acooks/jittertrap

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Showing 65 of 67 total issues

Don't make functions within a loop.
Open

          flowRank[interval] = flowRank[interval].filter(function (o) {

Disallow Functions in Loops (no-loop-func)

Writing functions within loops tends to result in errors due to the way the function creates a closure around the loop. For example:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    funcs[i] = function() {
        return i;
    };
}

In this case, you would expect each function created within the loop to return a different number. In reality, each function returns 10, because that was the last value of i in the scope.

let or const mitigate this problem.

/*eslint-env es6*/

for (let i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    funcs[i] = function() {
        return i;
    };
}

In this case, each function created within the loop returns a different number as expected.

Rule Details

This error is raised to highlight a piece of code that may not work as you expect it to and could also indicate a misunderstanding of how the language works. Your code may run without any problems if you do not fix this error, but in some situations it could behave unexpectedly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-loop-func: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    (function() { return i; })();
}

while(i) {
    var a = function() { return i; };
    a();
}

do {
    function a() { return i; };
    a();
} while (i);

let foo = 0;
for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    // Bad, function is referencing block scoped variable in the outer scope.
    var a = function() { return foo; };
    a();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-loop-func: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = function() {};

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    a();
}

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() {}; // OK, no references to variables in the outer scopes.
    a();
}

for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() { return i; }; // OK, all references are referring to block scoped variables in the loop.
    a();
}

var foo = 100;
for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() { return foo; }; // OK, all references are referring to never modified variables.
    a();
}
//... no modifications of foo after this loop ...

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Missing radix parameter.
Open

         'delay': parseInt($("#delay").val()),

Require Radix Parameter (radix)

When using the parseInt() function it is common to omit the second argument, the radix, and let the function try to determine from the first argument what type of number it is. By default, parseInt() will autodetect decimal and hexadecimal (via 0x prefix). Prior to ECMAScript 5, parseInt() also autodetected octal literals, which caused problems because many developers assumed a leading 0 would be ignored.

This confusion led to the suggestion that you always use the radix parameter to parseInt() to eliminate unintended consequences. So instead of doing this:

var num = parseInt("071");      // 57

Do this:

var num = parseInt("071", 10);  // 71

ECMAScript 5 changed the behavior of parseInt() so that it no longer autodetects octal literals and instead treats them as decimal literals. However, the differences between hexadecimal and decimal interpretation of the first parameter causes many developers to continue using the radix parameter to ensure the string is interpreted in the intended way.

On the other hand, if the code is targeting only ES5-compliant environments passing the radix 10 may be redundant. In such a case you might want to disallow using such a radix.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing the unintended conversion of a string to a number of a different base than intended or at preventing the redundant 10 radix if targeting modern environments only.

Options

There are two options for this rule:

  • "always" enforces providing a radix (default)
  • "as-needed" disallows providing the 10 radix

always

Examples of incorrect code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt(someValue);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce either presence or omission of the 10 radix value you can turn this rule off.

Further Reading

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.axis path,
Severity: Minor
Found in html5-client/src/css/jittertrap.css by csslint

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

    for (var ts in timeScaleTable) {

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md).

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

  • [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md)

Further Reading

Don't make functions within a loop.
Open

          this.timeoutHandles[i] = setTimeout(function(t, d, j, l) {

Disallow Functions in Loops (no-loop-func)

Writing functions within loops tends to result in errors due to the way the function creates a closure around the loop. For example:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    funcs[i] = function() {
        return i;
    };
}

In this case, you would expect each function created within the loop to return a different number. In reality, each function returns 10, because that was the last value of i in the scope.

let or const mitigate this problem.

/*eslint-env es6*/

for (let i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    funcs[i] = function() {
        return i;
    };
}

In this case, each function created within the loop returns a different number as expected.

Rule Details

This error is raised to highlight a piece of code that may not work as you expect it to and could also indicate a misunderstanding of how the language works. Your code may run without any problems if you do not fix this error, but in some situations it could behave unexpectedly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-loop-func: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    (function() { return i; })();
}

while(i) {
    var a = function() { return i; };
    a();
}

do {
    function a() { return i; };
    a();
} while (i);

let foo = 0;
for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    // Bad, function is referencing block scoped variable in the outer scope.
    var a = function() { return foo; };
    a();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-loop-func: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = function() {};

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    a();
}

for (var i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() {}; // OK, no references to variables in the outer scopes.
    a();
}

for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() { return i; }; // OK, all references are referring to block scoped variables in the loop.
    a();
}

var foo = 100;
for (let i=10; i; i--) {
    var a = function() { return foo; }; // OK, all references are referring to never modified variables.
    a();
}
//... no modifications of foo after this loop ...

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '!==' and instead saw '!='.
Open

      if (this != runningProgram) {

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Missing radix parameter.
Open

        trapValueInt     = parseInt(trapValue),

Require Radix Parameter (radix)

When using the parseInt() function it is common to omit the second argument, the radix, and let the function try to determine from the first argument what type of number it is. By default, parseInt() will autodetect decimal and hexadecimal (via 0x prefix). Prior to ECMAScript 5, parseInt() also autodetected octal literals, which caused problems because many developers assumed a leading 0 would be ignored.

This confusion led to the suggestion that you always use the radix parameter to parseInt() to eliminate unintended consequences. So instead of doing this:

var num = parseInt("071");      // 57

Do this:

var num = parseInt("071", 10);  // 71

ECMAScript 5 changed the behavior of parseInt() so that it no longer autodetects octal literals and instead treats them as decimal literals. However, the differences between hexadecimal and decimal interpretation of the first parameter causes many developers to continue using the radix parameter to ensure the string is interpreted in the intended way.

On the other hand, if the code is targeting only ES5-compliant environments passing the radix 10 may be redundant. In such a case you might want to disallow using such a radix.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing the unintended conversion of a string to a number of a different base than intended or at preventing the redundant 10 radix if targeting modern environments only.

Options

There are two options for this rule:

  • "always" enforces providing a radix (default)
  • "as-needed" disallows providing the 10 radix

always

Examples of incorrect code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt(someValue);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce either presence or omission of the 10 radix value you can turn this rule off.

Further Reading

Missing radix parameter.
Open

    var trapValueInt        = parseInt(trapValue);

Require Radix Parameter (radix)

When using the parseInt() function it is common to omit the second argument, the radix, and let the function try to determine from the first argument what type of number it is. By default, parseInt() will autodetect decimal and hexadecimal (via 0x prefix). Prior to ECMAScript 5, parseInt() also autodetected octal literals, which caused problems because many developers assumed a leading 0 would be ignored.

This confusion led to the suggestion that you always use the radix parameter to parseInt() to eliminate unintended consequences. So instead of doing this:

var num = parseInt("071");      // 57

Do this:

var num = parseInt("071", 10);  // 71

ECMAScript 5 changed the behavior of parseInt() so that it no longer autodetects octal literals and instead treats them as decimal literals. However, the differences between hexadecimal and decimal interpretation of the first parameter causes many developers to continue using the radix parameter to ensure the string is interpreted in the intended way.

On the other hand, if the code is targeting only ES5-compliant environments passing the radix 10 may be redundant. In such a case you might want to disallow using such a radix.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing the unintended conversion of a string to a number of a different base than intended or at preventing the redundant 10 radix if targeting modern environments only.

Options

There are two options for this rule:

  • "always" enforces providing a radix (default)
  • "as-needed" disallows providing the 10 radix

always

Examples of incorrect code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt(someValue);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce either presence or omission of the 10 radix value you can turn this rule off.

Further Reading

Don't use IDs in selectors.
Open

#traps_table tbody td {
Severity: Minor
Found in html5-client/src/css/jittertrap.css by csslint

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

    for (var key in timeScaleTable) {

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md).

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

  • [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md)

Further Reading

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

      for (var th in this.timeoutHandles) {

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md).

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

  • [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md)

Further Reading

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

    for (var key in timeScaleTable) {

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md).

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

  • [no-prototype-builtins](no-prototype-builtins.md)

Further Reading

Missing radix parameter.
Open

         'jitter': parseInt($("#jitter").val()),

Require Radix Parameter (radix)

When using the parseInt() function it is common to omit the second argument, the radix, and let the function try to determine from the first argument what type of number it is. By default, parseInt() will autodetect decimal and hexadecimal (via 0x prefix). Prior to ECMAScript 5, parseInt() also autodetected octal literals, which caused problems because many developers assumed a leading 0 would be ignored.

This confusion led to the suggestion that you always use the radix parameter to parseInt() to eliminate unintended consequences. So instead of doing this:

var num = parseInt("071");      // 57

Do this:

var num = parseInt("071", 10);  // 71

ECMAScript 5 changed the behavior of parseInt() so that it no longer autodetects octal literals and instead treats them as decimal literals. However, the differences between hexadecimal and decimal interpretation of the first parameter causes many developers to continue using the radix parameter to ensure the string is interpreted in the intended way.

On the other hand, if the code is targeting only ES5-compliant environments passing the radix 10 may be redundant. In such a case you might want to disallow using such a radix.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing the unintended conversion of a string to a number of a different base than intended or at preventing the redundant 10 radix if targeting modern environments only.

Options

There are two options for this rule:

  • "always" enforces providing a radix (default)
  • "as-needed" disallows providing the 10 radix

always

Examples of incorrect code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt(someValue);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the default "always" option:

/*eslint radix: "error"*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071", 10);

var num = parseInt("071", "abc");

var num = parseInt();

Examples of correct code for the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint radix: ["error", "as-needed"]*/

var num = parseInt("071");

var num = parseInt("071", 8);

var num = parseFloat(someValue);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce either presence or omission of the 10 radix value you can turn this rule off.

Further Reading

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

    if (my.charts.getChartPeriod() == timeScaleTable[timeScale]) {

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.page-header {
Severity: Minor
Found in html5-client/src/css/jittertrap.css by csslint

Unexpected trailing comma.
Open

        20: { stop: true },

require or disallow trailing commas (comma-dangle)

Trailing commas in object literals are valid according to the ECMAScript 5 (and ECMAScript 3!) spec. However, IE8 (when not in IE8 document mode) and below will throw an error when it encounters trailing commas in JavaScript.

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

Trailing commas simplify adding and removing items to objects and arrays, since only the lines you are modifying must be touched. Another argument in favor of trailing commas is that it improves the clarity of diffs when an item is added or removed from an object or array:

Less clear:

var foo = {
-    bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux"
+    bar: "baz"
 };

More clear:

var foo = {
     bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux",
 };

Rule Details

This rule enforces consistent use of trailing commas in object and array literals.

Options

This rule has a string option or an object option:

{
    "comma-dangle": ["error", "never"],
    // or
    "comma-dangle": ["error", {
        "arrays": "never",
        "objects": "never",
        "imports": "never",
        "exports": "never",
        "functions": "ignore",
    }]
}
  • "never" (default) disallows trailing commas
  • "always" requires trailing commas
  • "always-multiline" requires trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }
  • "only-multiline" allows (but does not require) trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }

Trailing commas in function declarations and function calls are valid syntax since ECMAScript 2017; however, the string option does not check these situations for backwards compatibility.

You can also use an object option to configure this rule for each type of syntax. Each of the following options can be set to "never", "always", "always-multiline", "only-multiline", or "ignore". The default for each option is "never" unless otherwise specified.

  • arrays is for array literals and array patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let [a,] = [1,];)
  • objects is for object literals and object patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let {a,} = {a: 1};)
  • imports is for import declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. import {a,} from "foo";)
  • exports is for export declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. export {a,};)
  • functions is for function declarations and function calls. (e.g. (function(a,){ })(b,);)
    functions is set to "ignore" by default for consistency with the string option.

never

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

always-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

only-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

functions

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

When Not To Use It

You can turn this rule off if you are not concerned with dangling commas. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.xGrid {
Severity: Minor
Found in html5-client/src/css/jittertrap.css by csslint

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

    console.assert(flowRank[interval].length ==

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.yGrid {
Severity: Minor
Found in html5-client/src/css/jittertrap.css by csslint

Unexpected trailing comma.
Open

                            programUID:  pgm.id,

require or disallow trailing commas (comma-dangle)

Trailing commas in object literals are valid according to the ECMAScript 5 (and ECMAScript 3!) spec. However, IE8 (when not in IE8 document mode) and below will throw an error when it encounters trailing commas in JavaScript.

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

Trailing commas simplify adding and removing items to objects and arrays, since only the lines you are modifying must be touched. Another argument in favor of trailing commas is that it improves the clarity of diffs when an item is added or removed from an object or array:

Less clear:

var foo = {
-    bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux"
+    bar: "baz"
 };

More clear:

var foo = {
     bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux",
 };

Rule Details

This rule enforces consistent use of trailing commas in object and array literals.

Options

This rule has a string option or an object option:

{
    "comma-dangle": ["error", "never"],
    // or
    "comma-dangle": ["error", {
        "arrays": "never",
        "objects": "never",
        "imports": "never",
        "exports": "never",
        "functions": "ignore",
    }]
}
  • "never" (default) disallows trailing commas
  • "always" requires trailing commas
  • "always-multiline" requires trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }
  • "only-multiline" allows (but does not require) trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }

Trailing commas in function declarations and function calls are valid syntax since ECMAScript 2017; however, the string option does not check these situations for backwards compatibility.

You can also use an object option to configure this rule for each type of syntax. Each of the following options can be set to "never", "always", "always-multiline", "only-multiline", or "ignore". The default for each option is "never" unless otherwise specified.

  • arrays is for array literals and array patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let [a,] = [1,];)
  • objects is for object literals and object patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let {a,} = {a: 1};)
  • imports is for import declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. import {a,} from "foo";)
  • exports is for export declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. export {a,};)
  • functions is for function declarations and function calls. (e.g. (function(a,){ })(b,);)
    functions is set to "ignore" by default for consistency with the string option.

never

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

always-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

only-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

functions

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

When Not To Use It

You can turn this rule off if you are not concerned with dangling commas. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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