daddyz/phonelib

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lib/validators/phone_validator.rb

Summary

Maintainability
A
1 hr
Test Coverage

Cyclomatic complexity for validate_each is too high. [7/6]
Open

  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    return if options[:allow_blank] && value.blank?

    @phone = parse(value, specified_country(record))
    valid = phone_valid? && valid_types? && valid_country? && valid_extensions?
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks that the cyclomatic complexity of methods is not higher than the configured maximum. The cyclomatic complexity is the number of linearly independent paths through a method. The algorithm counts decision points and adds one.

An if statement (or unless or ?:) increases the complexity by one. An else branch does not, since it doesn't add a decision point. The && operator (or keyword and) can be converted to a nested if statement, and ||/or is shorthand for a sequence of ifs, so they also add one. Loops can be said to have an exit condition, so they add one.

Identical blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

  def phone_types
    method = options[:possible] ? :possible_types : :types
    phone_types = @phone.send(method)
    if (phone_types & [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_OR_MOBILE]).size > 0
      phone_types += [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_LINE, Phonelib::Core::MOBILE]
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb and 1 other location - About 35 mins to fix
lib/validators/phone_validator3.rb on lines 104..110

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 34.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Identical blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    return if options[:allow_blank] && value.blank?

    @phone = parse(value, specified_country(record))
    valid = phone_valid? && valid_types? && valid_country? && valid_extensions?
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb and 1 other location - About 30 mins to fix
lib/validators/phone_validator3.rb on lines 59..65

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 33.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Line is too long. [94/80]
Open

    countries = options[:countries].is_a?(Array) ? options[:countries] : [options[:countries]]
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

Use !empty? instead of size > 0.
Open

    if (phone_types & [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_OR_MOBILE]).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for numeric comparisons that can be replaced by a predicate method, such as receiver.length == 0, receiver.length > 0, receiver.length != 0, receiver.length < 1 and receiver.size == 0 that can be replaced by receiver.empty? and !receiver.empty.

Example:

# bad
[1, 2, 3].length == 0
0 == "foobar".length
array.length < 1
{a: 1, b: 2}.length != 0
string.length > 0
hash.size > 0

# good
[1, 2, 3].empty?
"foobar".empty?
array.empty?
!{a: 1, b: 2}.empty?
!string.empty?
!hash.empty?

Use (phone_types & types).size.positive? instead of (phone_types & types).size > 0.
Open

    (phone_types & types).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for usage of comparison operators (==, >, <) to test numbers as zero, positive, or negative. These can be replaced by their respective predicate methods. The cop can also be configured to do the reverse.

The cop disregards #nonzero? as it its value is truthy or falsey, but not true and false, and thus not always interchangeable with != 0.

The cop ignores comparisons to global variables, since they are often populated with objects which can be compared with integers, but are not themselves Interger polymorphic.

Example: EnforcedStyle: predicate (default)

# bad

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

# good

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

Example: EnforcedStyle: comparison

# bad

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

# good

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

Missing magic comment # frozen_string_literal: true.
Open

# Validator class for phone validations
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop is designed to help upgrade to Ruby 3.0. It will add the comment # frozen_string_literal: true to the top of files to enable frozen string literals. Frozen string literals may be default in Ruby 3.0. The comment will be added below a shebang and encoding comment. The frozen string literal comment is only valid in Ruby 2.3+.

Example: EnforcedStyle: when_needed (default)

# The `when_needed` style will add the frozen string literal comment
# to files only when the `TargetRubyVersion` is set to 2.3+.
# bad
module Foo
  # ...
end

# good
# frozen_string_literal: true

module Foo
  # ...
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: always

# The `always` style will always add the frozen string literal comment
# to a file, regardless of the Ruby version or if `freeze` or `<

Example: EnforcedStyle: never

# The `never` will enforce that the frozen string literal comment does
# not exist in a file.
# bad
# frozen_string_literal: true

module Baz
  # ...
end

# good
module Baz
  # ...
end

Use Hash#key? instead of Hash#has_key?.
Open

    return true if !options.has_key?(:extensions) || options[:extensions]
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop (by default) checks for uses of methods Hash#haskey? and Hash#hasvalue? where it enforces Hash#key? and Hash#value? It is configurable to enforce the inverse, using verbose method names also.

Example: EnforcedStyle: short (default)

# bad Hash#haskey? Hash#hasvalue?

# good Hash#key? Hash#value?

Example: EnforcedStyle: verbose

# bad Hash#key? Hash#value?

# good Hash#haskey? Hash#hasvalue?

Use (phone_countries & countries).size.positive? instead of (phone_countries & countries).size > 0.
Open

    (phone_countries & countries).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for usage of comparison operators (==, >, <) to test numbers as zero, positive, or negative. These can be replaced by their respective predicate methods. The cop can also be configured to do the reverse.

The cop disregards #nonzero? as it its value is truthy or falsey, but not true and false, and thus not always interchangeable with != 0.

The cop ignores comparisons to global variables, since they are often populated with objects which can be compared with integers, but are not themselves Interger polymorphic.

Example: EnforcedStyle: predicate (default)

# bad

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

# good

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

Example: EnforcedStyle: comparison

# bad

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

# good

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

Use (phone_types & [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_OR_MOBILE]).size.positive? instead of (phone_types & [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_OR_MOBILE]).size > 0.
Open

    if (phone_types & [Phonelib::Core::FIXED_OR_MOBILE]).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for usage of comparison operators (==, >, <) to test numbers as zero, positive, or negative. These can be replaced by their respective predicate methods. The cop can also be configured to do the reverse.

The cop disregards #nonzero? as it its value is truthy or falsey, but not true and false, and thus not always interchangeable with != 0.

The cop ignores comparisons to global variables, since they are often populated with objects which can be compared with integers, but are not themselves Interger polymorphic.

Example: EnforcedStyle: predicate (default)

# bad

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

# good

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

Example: EnforcedStyle: comparison

# bad

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

# good

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

Use !empty? instead of size > 0.
Open

    (phone_types & types).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for numeric comparisons that can be replaced by a predicate method, such as receiver.length == 0, receiver.length > 0, receiver.length != 0, receiver.length < 1 and receiver.size == 0 that can be replaced by receiver.empty? and !receiver.empty.

Example:

# bad
[1, 2, 3].length == 0
0 == "foobar".length
array.length < 1
{a: 1, b: 2}.length != 0
string.length > 0
hash.size > 0

# good
[1, 2, 3].empty?
"foobar".empty?
array.empty?
!{a: 1, b: 2}.empty?
!string.empty?
!hash.empty?

Use !empty? instead of size > 0.
Open

    (phone_countries & countries).size > 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/validators/phone_validator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for numeric comparisons that can be replaced by a predicate method, such as receiver.length == 0, receiver.length > 0, receiver.length != 0, receiver.length < 1 and receiver.size == 0 that can be replaced by receiver.empty? and !receiver.empty.

Example:

# bad
[1, 2, 3].length == 0
0 == "foobar".length
array.length < 1
{a: 1, b: 2}.length != 0
string.length > 0
hash.size > 0

# good
[1, 2, 3].empty?
"foobar".empty?
array.empty?
!{a: 1, b: 2}.empty?
!string.empty?
!hash.empty?

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