diaspora/diaspora

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app/models/profile.rb

Summary

Maintainability
A
1 hr
Test Coverage

Assignment Branch Condition size for date= is too high. [22.72/20]
Open

  def date= params
    if %w(month day).all? {|key| params[key].present? }
      params["year"] = "1004" if params["year"].blank?
      if Date.valid_civil?(params["year"].to_i, params["month"].to_i, params["day"].to_i)
        self.birthday = Date.new(params["year"].to_i, params["month"].to_i, params["day"].to_i)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks that the ABC size of methods is not higher than the configured maximum. The ABC size is based on assignments, branches (method calls), and conditions. See http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AbcMetric

Method image_url has a Cognitive Complexity of 10 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

  def image_url(size=:thumb_large)
    result = if size == :thumb_medium && self[:image_url_medium]
               self[:image_url_medium]
             elsif size == :thumb_small && self[:image_url_small]
               self[:image_url_small]
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb - About 1 hr to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Method date= has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

  def date= params
    if %w(month day).all? {|key| params[key].present? }
      params["year"] = "1004" if params["year"].blank?
      if Date.valid_civil?(params["year"].to_i, params["month"].to_i, params["day"].to_i)
        self.birthday = Date.new(params["year"].to_i, params["month"].to_i, params["day"].to_i)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Use old.presence || new instead of old.blank? ? new : old.
Open

    self.attributes.merge(update_hash){|key, old, new| old.blank? ? new : old}
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks code that can be written more easily using Object#presence defined by Active Support.

Example:

# bad
a.present? ? a : nil

# bad
!a.present? ? nil : a

# bad
a.blank? ? nil : a

# bad
!a.blank? ? a : nil

# good
a.presence

Example:

# bad
a.present? ? a : b

# bad
!a.present? ? b : a

# bad
a.blank? ? b : a

# bad
!a.blank? ? a : b

# good
a.presence || b

Use =~ in places where the MatchData returned by #match will not be used.
Open

    return url if url.match(/^https?:\/\//)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop identifies the use of Regexp#match or String#match, which returns #<MatchData>/nil. The return value of =~ is an integral index/nil and is more performant.

Example:

# bad
do_something if str.match(/regex/)
while regex.match('str')
  do_something
end

# good
method(str =~ /regex/)
return value unless regex =~ 'str'

Align the elements of a hash literal if they span more than one line.
Open

               'location' =>  'location',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Check that the keys, separators, and values of a multi-line hash literal are aligned according to configuration. The configuration options are:

- key (left align keys)
- separator (align hash rockets and colons, right align keys)
- table (left align keys, hash rockets, and values)

The treatment of hashes passed as the last argument to a method call can also be configured. The options are:

- always_inspect
- always_ignore
- ignore_implicit (without curly braces)
- ignore_explicit (with curly braces)

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: key (default)
# EnforcedColonStyle: key (default)

# good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}

# bad
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: separator
# EnforcedColonStyle: separator

#good
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: table
# EnforcedColonStyle: table

#good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba:  baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.full_name = [self.first_name, self.last_name].join(' ').downcase.strip
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'location' =>  'location',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Align the elements of a hash literal if they span more than one line.
Open

               'image' => 'image_url',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Check that the keys, separators, and values of a multi-line hash literal are aligned according to configuration. The configuration options are:

- key (left align keys)
- separator (align hash rockets and colons, right align keys)
- table (left align keys, hash rockets, and values)

The treatment of hashes passed as the last argument to a method call can also be configured. The options are:

- always_inspect
- always_ignore
- ignore_implicit (without curly braces)
- ignore_explicit (with curly braces)

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: key (default)
# EnforcedColonStyle: key (default)

# good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}

# bad
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: separator
# EnforcedColonStyle: separator

#good
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: table
# EnforcedColonStyle: table

#good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba:  baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Missing space after #.
Open

    #get the parent diaspora handle, unless we want to access a profile without a person
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks whether comments have a leading space after the # denoting the start of the comment. The leading space is not required for some RDoc special syntax, like #++, #--, #:nodoc, =begin- and =end comments, "shebang" directives, or rackup options.

Example:

# bad
#Some comment

# good
# Some comment

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates_format_of :last_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Align the elements of a hash literal if they span more than one line.
Open

               'name' => 'first_name',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Check that the keys, separators, and values of a multi-line hash literal are aligned according to configuration. The configuration options are:

- key (left align keys)
- separator (align hash rockets and colons, right align keys)
- table (left align keys, hash rockets, and values)

The treatment of hashes passed as the last argument to a method call can also be configured. The options are:

- always_inspect
- always_ignore
- ignore_implicit (without curly braces)
- ignore_explicit (with curly braces)

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: key (default)
# EnforcedColonStyle: key (default)

# good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}

# bad
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: separator
# EnforcedColonStyle: separator

#good
{
  foo: bar,
   ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba => baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

Example:

# EnforcedHashRocketStyle: table
# EnforcedColonStyle: table

#good
{
  foo: bar,
  ba:  baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
  :ba  => baz
}

#bad
{
  foo: bar,
  ba: baz
}
{
  :foo => bar,
   :ba => baz
}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.construct_full_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    self.tag_string = self.tag_string.split[0..4].join(' ')
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Space inside { detected.
Open

  validates :first_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :first_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates_format_of :last_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

  def date= params
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.first_name.strip! if self.first_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'image' => 'image_url',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Omit parentheses for ternary conditions.
Open

    (self.person) ? self.person.diaspora_handle : self[:diaspora_handle]
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for the presence of parentheses around ternary conditions. It is configurable to enforce inclusion or omission of parentheses using EnforcedStyle. Omission is only enforced when removing the parentheses won't cause a different behavior.

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses (default)

# bad
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

# good
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses

# bad
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

# good
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

Example: EnforcedStyle: requireparentheseswhen_complex

# bad
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

# good
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

Prefer the new style validations validates :column, format: value over validates_format_of.
Open

  validates_format_of :last_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :tag_list, :length => { :maximum => 5 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :last_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :location, :length => { :maximum =>255 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.full_name = [self.first_name, self.last_name].join(' ').downcase.strip
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    if self.tag_string.count('#') > 5
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    if self.tag_string.count('#') > 5
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Avoid comma after the last item of a hash.
Open

               'location' =>  'location',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for trailing comma in array and hash literals.

Example: EnforcedStyleForMultiline: consistent_comma

# bad
a = [1, 2,]

# good
a = [
  1, 2,
  3,
]

# good
a = [
  1,
  2,
]

Example: EnforcedStyleForMultiline: comma

# bad
a = [1, 2,]

# good
a = [
  1,
  2,
]

Example: EnforcedStyleForMultiline: no_comma (default)

# bad
a = [1, 2,]

# good
a = [
  1,
  2
]

%w-literals should be delimited by [ and ].
Open

    if %w(month day).all? {|key| params[key].present? }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop enforces the consistent usage of %-literal delimiters.

Specify the 'default' key to set all preferred delimiters at once. You can continue to specify individual preferred delimiters to override the default.

Example:

# Style/PercentLiteralDelimiters:
#   PreferredDelimiters:
#     default: '[]'
#     '%i':    '()'

# good
%w[alpha beta] + %i(gamma delta)

# bad
%W(alpha #{beta})

# bad
%I(alpha beta)

Redundant self detected.
Open

    (self.person) ? self.person.diaspora_handle : self[:diaspora_handle]
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.attributes.merge(update_hash){|key, old, new| old.blank? ? new : old}
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :tag_list, :length => { :maximum => 5 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :location, :length => { :maximum =>255 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.tag_string = self.tag_string.split[0..4].join(' ')
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.first_name.strip! if self.first_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.last_name.strip! if self.last_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'image' => 'image_url',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Unused block argument - key. If it's necessary, use _ or _key as an argument name to indicate that it won't be used.
Open

    self.attributes.merge(update_hash){|key, old, new| old.blank? ? new : old}
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for unused block arguments.

Example:

# bad

do_something do |used, unused|
  puts used
end

do_something do |bar|
  puts :foo
end

define_method(:foo) do |bar|
  puts :baz
end

Example:

#good

do_something do |used, _unused|
  puts used
end

do_something do
  puts :foo
end

define_method(:foo) do |_bar|
  puts :baz
end

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression.
Open

    if self.tag_string.count('#') > 5
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression

Example:

# bad
def test
  if something
    work
  end
end

# good
def test
  return unless something
  work
end

# also good
def test
  work if something
end

# bad
if something
  raise 'exception'
else
  ok
end

# good
raise 'exception' if something
ok

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :last_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'name' => 'first_name',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Closing hash brace must be on the same line as the last hash element when opening brace is on the same line as the first hash element.
Open

                }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks that the closing brace in a hash literal is either on the same line as the last hash element, or a new line.

When using the symmetrical (default) style:

If a hash's opening brace is on the same line as the first element of the hash, then the closing brace should be on the same line as the last element of the hash.

If a hash's opening brace is on the line above the first element of the hash, then the closing brace should be on the line below the last element of the hash.

When using the new_line style:

The closing brace of a multi-line hash literal must be on the line after the last element of the hash.

When using the same_line style:

The closing brace of a multi-line hash literal must be on the same line as the last element of the hash.

Example: EnforcedStyle: symmetrical (default)

# bad
  { a: 1,
    b: 2
  }
  # bad
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2 }

  # good
  { a: 1,
    b: 2 }

  # good
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
  }

Example: EnforcedStyle: new_line

# bad
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2 }

  # bad
  { a: 1,
    b: 2 }

  # good
  { a: 1,
    b: 2
  }

  # good
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
  }

Example: EnforcedStyle: same_line

# bad
  { a: 1,
    b: 2
  }

  # bad
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
  }

  # good
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2 }

  # good
  { a: 1,
    b: 2 }

%w-literals should be delimited by [ and ].
Open

    elsif %w(year month day).all? {|key| params[key].blank? }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop enforces the consistent usage of %-literal delimiters.

Specify the 'default' key to set all preferred delimiters at once. You can continue to specify individual preferred delimiters to override the default.

Example:

# Style/PercentLiteralDelimiters:
#   PreferredDelimiters:
#     default: '[]'
#     '%i':    '()'

# good
%w[alpha beta] + %i(gamma delta)

# bad
%W(alpha #{beta})

# bad
%I(alpha beta)

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.taggings.delete_all
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'name' => 'first_name',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    self.full_name = [self.first_name, self.last_name].join(' ').downcase.strip
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Space inside { detected.
Open

  validates :tag_list, :length => { :maximum => 5 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Space inside } detected.
Open

  validates :last_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression.
Open

    if @invalid_birthday_date
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression

Example:

# bad
def test
  if something
    work
  end
end

# good
def test
  return unless something
  work
end

# also good
def test
  work if something
end

# bad
if something
  raise 'exception'
else
  ok
end

# good
raise 'exception' if something
ok

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates :first_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates_format_of :first_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.build_tags
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Keep a blank line before and after protected.
Open

  protected
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Access modifiers should be surrounded by blank lines.

Example:

# bad
class Foo
  def bar; end
  private
  def baz; end
end

# good
class Foo
  def bar; end

  private

  def baz; end
end

Space missing to the left of {.
Open

    self.attributes.merge(update_hash){|key, old, new| old.blank? ? new : old}
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that block braces have or don't have a space before the opening brace depending on configuration.

Example:

# bad
foo.map{ |a|
  a.bar.to_s
}

# good
foo.map { |a|
  a.bar.to_s
}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.full_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

               'location' =>  'location',
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Space missing inside }.
Open

    self.attributes.merge(update_hash){|key, old, new| old.blank? ? new : old}
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that block braces have or don't have surrounding space inside them on configuration. For blocks taking parameters, it checks that the left brace has or doesn't have trailing space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space (default)

# The `space` style enforces that block braces have
# surrounding space.

# bad
some_array.each {puts e}

# good
some_array.each { puts e }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that block braces don't
# have surrounding space.

# bad
some_array.each { puts e }

# good
some_array.each {puts e}

Example: EnforcedStyleForEmptyBraces: no_space (default)

# The `no_space` EnforcedStyleForEmptyBraces style enforces that
# block braces don't have a space in between when empty.

# bad
some_array.each {   }
some_array.each {  }
some_array.each { }

# good
some_array.each {}

Example: EnforcedStyleForEmptyBraces: space

# The `space` EnforcedStyleForEmptyBraces style enforces that
# block braces have at least a spece in between when empty.

# bad
some_array.each {}

# good
some_array.each { }
some_array.each {  }
some_array.each {   }

Example: SpaceBeforeBlockParameters: true (default)

# The SpaceBeforeBlockParameters style set to `true` enforces that
# there is a space between `{` and `|`. Overrides `EnforcedStyle`
# if there is a conflict.

# bad
[1, 2, 3].each {|n| n * 2 }

# good
[1, 2, 3].each { |n| n * 2 }

Example: SpaceBeforeBlockParameters: true

# The SpaceBeforeBlockParameters style set to `false` enforces that
# there is no space between `{` and `|`. Overrides `EnforcedStyle`
# if there is a conflict.

# bad
[1, 2, 3].each { |n| n * 2 }

# good
[1, 2, 3].each {|n| n * 2 }

Space inside } detected.
Open

  validates :tag_list, :length => { :maximum => 5 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Method Profile#tag_string is defined at both app/models/profile.rb:13 and app/models/profile.rb:119.
Open

  def tag_string
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for duplicated instance (or singleton) method definitions.

Example:

# bad

def duplicated
  1
end

def duplicated
  2
end

Example:

# bad

def duplicated
  1
end

alias duplicated other_duplicated

Example:

# good

def duplicated
  1
end

def other_duplicated
  2
end

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  validates_format_of :first_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.build_tags
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Use %r around regular expression.
Open

    return nil if url.blank? || url.match(/user\/default/)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop enforces using // or %r around regular expressions.

Example: EnforcedStyle: slashes (default)

# bad
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# bad
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

# good
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# good
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

Example: EnforcedStyle: percent_r

# bad
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# bad
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

# good
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# good
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

Example: EnforcedStyle: mixed

# bad
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# bad
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

# good
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# good
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

Example: AllowInnerSlashes: false (default)

# If `false`, the cop will always recommend using `%r` if one or more
# slashes are found in the regexp string.

# bad
x =~ /home\//

# good
x =~ %r{home/}

Example: AllowInnerSlashes: true

# good
x =~ /home\//

Use %r around regular expression.
Open

    return url if url.match(/^https?:\/\//)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop enforces using // or %r around regular expressions.

Example: EnforcedStyle: slashes (default)

# bad
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# bad
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

# good
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# good
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

Example: EnforcedStyle: percent_r

# bad
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# bad
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

# good
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# good
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

Example: EnforcedStyle: mixed

# bad
snake_case = %r{^[\dA-Z_]+$}

# bad
regex = /
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
/x

# good
snake_case = /^[\dA-Z_]+$/

# good
regex = %r{
  foo
  (bar)
  (baz)
}x

Example: AllowInnerSlashes: false (default)

# If `false`, the cop will always recommend using `%r` if one or more
# slashes are found in the regexp string.

# bad
x =~ /home\//

# good
x =~ %r{home/}

Example: AllowInnerSlashes: true

# good
x =~ /home\//

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

    self.first_name.strip! if self.first_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

    self.last_name.strip! if self.last_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

Space inside } detected.
Open

  validates :first_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Space inside { detected.
Open

  validates :last_name, :length => { :maximum => 32 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Don't use parentheses around a method call.
Open

    (self.person) ? self.person.diaspora_handle : self[:diaspora_handle]
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant parentheses.

Example:

# bad
(x) if ((y.z).nil?)

# good
x if y.z.nil?

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.save
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Redundant self detected.
Open

    self.last_name.strip! if self.last_name
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      errors[:base] << 'Profile cannot have more than five tags'
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Space inside { detected.
Open

  validates :location, :length => { :maximum =>255 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Space inside } detected.
Open

  validates :location, :length => { :maximum =>255 }
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks that braces used for hash literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that hash literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

# good
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that hash literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
h = { a: 1, b: 2 }

# good
h = {a: 1, b: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# hash braces, with the exception that successive left
# braces or right braces are collapsed together in nested hashes.

# bad
h = { a: { b: 2 } }

# good
h = { a: { b: 2 }}

Favor modifier if usage when having a single-line body. Another good alternative is the usage of control flow &&/||.
Open

    if self.tag_string.count('#') > 5
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

Checks for if and unless statements that would fit on one line if written as a modifier if/unless. The maximum line length is configured in the Metrics/LineLength cop.

Example:

# bad
if condition
  do_stuff(bar)
end

unless qux.empty?
  Foo.do_something
end

# good
do_stuff(bar) if condition
Foo.do_something unless qux.empty?

Redundant self detected.
Open

    (self.person) ? self.person.diaspora_handle : self[:diaspora_handle]
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for redundant uses of self.

The usage of self is only needed when:

  • Sending a message to same object with zero arguments in presence of a method name clash with an argument or a local variable.

  • Calling an attribute writer to prevent an local variable assignment.

Note, with using explicit self you can only send messages with public or protected scope, you cannot send private messages this way.

Note we allow uses of self with operators because it would be awkward otherwise.

Example:

# bad
def foo(bar)
  self.baz
end

# good
def foo(bar)
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the argument.
end

def foo
  bar = 1
  self.bar  # Resolves name clash with the local variable.
end

def foo
  %w[x y z].select do |bar|
    self.bar == bar  # Resolves name clash with argument of the block.
  end
end

Prefer the new style validations validates :column, format: value over validates_format_of.
Open

  validates_format_of :first_name, :with => /\A[^;]+\z/, :allow_blank => true
Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/profile.rb by rubocop

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