diaspora/diaspora

View on GitHub

Showing 4,542 of 4,542 total issues

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

      create_hash(model, :range => range)

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      @segment = t('admins.stats.week')

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      @segment = t('admins.stats.2weeks')

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Do not use unless with else. Rewrite these with the positive case first.
Open

    unless user
      EmailInviter.new(email, inviter).send!
      flash[:notice] = "invitation sent to #{email}"
    else
      flash[:notice]= "error sending invite to #{email}"

This cop looks for unless expressions with else clauses.

Example:

# bad
unless foo_bar.nil?
  # do something...
else
  # do a different thing...
end

# good
if foo_bar.present?
  # do something...
else
  # do a different thing...
end

Missing space after #.
Open

  #https://gist.github.com/oliverbarnes/6096959 #=> hash with twitter specific extra

This cop checks whether comments have a leading space after the # denoting the start of the comment. The leading space is not required for some RDoc special syntax, like #++, #--, #:nodoc, =begin- and =end comments, "shebang" directives, or rackup options.

Example:

# bad
#Some comment

# good
# Some comment

Use if username.present? instead of unless username.blank?.
Open

      res = res.where(users[:username].matches("%#{username}%")) unless username.blank?

This cops checks for code that can be changed to blank?. Settings: NotNilAndNotEmpty: Convert checks for not nil and not empty? to present? NotBlank: Convert usages of not blank? to present? UnlessBlank: Convert usages of unless blank? to if present?

Example:

# NotNilAndNotEmpty: true
  # bad
  !foo.nil? && !foo.empty?
  foo != nil && !foo.empty?
  !foo.blank?

  # good
  foo.present?

# NotBlank: true
  # bad
  !foo.blank?
  not foo.blank?

  # good
  foo.present?

# UnlessBlank: true
  # bad
  something unless foo.blank?

  # good
  something if  foo.present?

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  respond_to :json, :only => :inviter

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use if email.present? instead of unless email.blank?.
Open

      res = res.where(users[:email].matches("%#{email}%")) unless email.blank?

This cops checks for code that can be changed to blank?. Settings: NotNilAndNotEmpty: Convert checks for not nil and not empty? to present? NotBlank: Convert usages of not blank? to present? UnlessBlank: Convert usages of unless blank? to if present?

Example:

# NotNilAndNotEmpty: true
  # bad
  !foo.nil? && !foo.empty?
  foo != nil && !foo.empty?
  !foo.blank?

  # good
  foo.present?

# NotBlank: true
  # bad
  !foo.blank?
  not foo.blank?

  # good
  foo.present?

# UnlessBlank: true
  # bad
  something unless foo.blank?

  # good
  something if  foo.present?

The use of eval is a serious security risk.
Open

    eval(<<DATA

This cop checks for the use of Kernel#eval and Binding#eval.

Example:

# bad

eval(something)
binding.eval(something)

Space inside parentheses detected.
Open

    service = Service.initialize_from_omniauth( omniauth_hash )

Checks for spaces inside ordinary round parentheses.

Example:

# bad
f( 3)
g = (a + 3 )

# good
f(3)
g = (a + 3)

Space inside parentheses detected.
Open

      flash[:error] =  I18n.t( 'services.create.read_only_access' )

Checks for spaces inside ordinary round parentheses.

Example:

# bad
f( 3)
g = (a + 3 )

# good
f(3)
g = (a + 3)

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      flash[:error] =  I18n.t( 'services.create.read_only_access' )

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    request.env['omniauth.origin']

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

    render :file => Rails.root.join('public', '404').to_s,

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

      @answer_html = render_to_string :partial => 'people/person', :locals => @hashes.first

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

        redirect_to :action => "show", :id => params[:person_id]

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use %i or %I for an array of symbols.
Open

  respond_to :json, :only => [:index, :show]

This cop can check for array literals made up of symbols that are not using the %i() syntax.

Alternatively, it checks for symbol arrays using the %i() syntax on projects which do not want to use that syntax.

Configuration option: MinSize If set, arrays with fewer elements than this value will not trigger the cop. For example, a MinSize of3` will not enforce a style on an array of 2 or fewer elements.

Example: EnforcedStyle: percent (default)

# good
%i[foo bar baz]

# bad
[:foo, :bar, :baz]

Example: EnforcedStyle: brackets

# good
[:foo, :bar, :baz]

# bad
%i[foo bar baz]

Align else with if.
Open

      else

This cops checks the alignment of else keywords. Normally they should be aligned with an if/unless/while/until/begin/def keyword, but there are special cases when they should follow the same rules as the alignment of end.

Example:

# bad
if something
  code
 else
  code
end

# bad
if something
  code
 elsif something
  code
end

# good
if something
  code
else
  code
end

%w-literals should be delimited by [ and ].
Open

      if %w(username email guid under13).all? { |attr| public_send(attr).blank? }

This cop enforces the consistent usage of %-literal delimiters.

Specify the 'default' key to set all preferred delimiters at once. You can continue to specify individual preferred delimiters to override the default.

Example:

# Style/PercentLiteralDelimiters:
#   PreferredDelimiters:
#     default: '[]'
#     '%i':    '()'

# good
%w[alpha beta] + %i(gamma delta)

# bad
%W(alpha #{beta})

# bad
%I(alpha beta)

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      @segment = t('admins.stats.daily')

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"
Severity
Category
Status
Source
Language