diaspora/diaspora

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Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    @search_query ||= params[:q] || params[:term] || ''

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Do not use Date.today without zone. Use Time.zone.today instead.
Open

      res = res.where(profiles[:birthday].gt(Date.today-13.years)) if under13 == '1'

This cop checks for the correct use of Date methods, such as Date.today, Date.current etc.

Using Date.today is dangerous, because it doesn't know anything about Rails time zone. You must use Time.zone.today instead.

The cop also reports warnings when you are using 'to_time' method, because it doesn't know about Rails time zone either.

Two styles are supported for this cop. When EnforcedStyle is 'strict' then the Date methods (today, current, yesterday, tomorrow) are prohibited and the usage of both 'totime' and 'totimeincurrent_zone' is reported as warning.

When EnforcedStyle is 'flexible' then only 'Date.today' is prohibited and only 'to_time' is reported as warning.

Example: EnforcedStyle: strict

# bad
Date.current
Date.yesterday
Date.today
date.to_time
date.to_time_in_current_zone

# good
Time.zone.today
Time.zone.today - 1.day

Example: EnforcedStyle: flexible (default)

# bad
Date.today
date.to_time

# good
Time.zone.today
Time.zone.today - 1.day
Date.current
Date.yesterday
date.to_time_in_current_zone

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

        partial_dir.join('terms.erb').exist?
Severity: Minor
Found in app/controllers/terms_controller.rb by rubocop

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

  skip_before_action :verify_authenticity_token, :only => :create

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

        format.json { render :json => @conversation, :status => 200 }

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Avoid rescuing without specifying an error class.
Open

  rescue
Severity: Minor
Found in app/controllers/posts_controller.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for rescuing StandardError. There are two supported styles implicit and explicit. This cop will not register an offense if any error other than StandardError is specified.

Example: EnforcedStyle: implicit

# `implicit` will enforce using `rescue` instead of
# `rescue StandardError`.

# bad
begin
  foo
rescue StandardError
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue OtherError
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue StandardError, SecurityError
  bar
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: explicit (default)

# `explicit` will enforce using `rescue StandardError`
# instead of `rescue`.

# bad
begin
  foo
rescue
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue StandardError
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue OtherError
  bar
end

# good
begin
  foo
rescue StandardError, SecurityError
  bar
end

Extra empty line detected at class body end.
Open


end
Severity: Minor
Found in app/controllers/terms_controller.rb by rubocop

This cops checks if empty lines around the bodies of classes match the configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: empty_lines

# good

class Foo

  def bar
    # ...
  end

end

Example: EnforcedStyle: emptylinesexcept_namespace

# good

class Foo
  class Bar

    # ...

  end
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: emptylinesspecial

# good
class Foo

  def bar; end

end

Example: EnforcedStyle: noemptylines (default)

# good

class Foo
  def bar
    # ...
  end
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    request.env['omniauth.auth']

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    flash[:notice] = I18n.t 'services.destroy.success'

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Favor modifier if usage when having a single-line body. Another good alternative is the usage of control flow &&/||.
Open

        if user_signed_in?

Checks for if and unless statements that would fit on one line if written as a modifier if/unless. The maximum line length is configured in the Metrics/LineLength cop.

Example:

# bad
if condition
  do_stuff(bar)
end

unless qux.empty?
  Foo.do_something
end

# good
do_stuff(bar) if condition
Foo.do_something unless qux.empty?

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

        @people = @people.paginate(:page => params[:page], :per_page => 15)

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression.
Open

    if service = Service.where(uid: omniauth_hash['uid']).first

Use a guard clause instead of wrapping the code inside a conditional expression

Example:

# bad
def test
  if something
    work
  end
end

# good
def test
  return unless something
  work
end

# also good
def test
  work if something
end

# bad
if something
  raise 'exception'
else
  ok
end

# good
raise 'exception' if something
ok

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    twitter_access_token.response.header['x-access-level']

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

    render :file => Rails.root.join('public', '404').to_s,

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Do not use unless with else. Rewrite these with the positive case first.
Open

    unless user
      EmailInviter.new(email, inviter).send!
      flash[:notice] = "invitation sent to #{email}"
    else
      flash[:notice]= "error sending invite to #{email}"

This cop looks for unless expressions with else clauses.

Example:

# bad
unless foo_bar.nil?
  # do something...
else
  # do a different thing...
end

# good
if foo_bar.present?
  # do something...
else
  # do a different thing...
end

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

      @segment = t('admins.stats.daily')

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

        redirect_to :action => "show", :id => params[:person_id]

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Use find_by instead of dynamic find_by_id.
Open

      service = Service.find_by_id(service_id)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/workers/post_to_service.rb by rubocop

This cop checks dynamic find_by_* methods. Use find_by instead of dynamic method. See. https://github.com/bbatsov/rails-style-guide#find_by

Example:

# bad
User.find_by_name(name)

# bad
User.find_by_name_and_email(name)

# bad
User.find_by_email!(name)

# good
User.find_by(name: name)

# good
User.find_by(name: name, email: email)

# good
User.find_by!(email: email)

%i-literals should be delimited by [ and ].
Open

  before_action :authenticate_if_remote_profile!, only: %i(show stream)

This cop enforces the consistent usage of %-literal delimiters.

Specify the 'default' key to set all preferred delimiters at once. You can continue to specify individual preferred delimiters to override the default.

Example:

# Style/PercentLiteralDelimiters:
#   PreferredDelimiters:
#     default: '[]'
#     '%i':    '()'

# good
%w[alpha beta] + %i(gamma delta)

# bad
%W(alpha #{beta})

# bad
%I(alpha beta)

Use find_by instead of dynamic find_by_id.
Open

      post = Post.find_by_id(post_id)
Severity: Minor
Found in app/workers/post_to_service.rb by rubocop

This cop checks dynamic find_by_* methods. Use find_by instead of dynamic method. See. https://github.com/bbatsov/rails-style-guide#find_by

Example:

# bad
User.find_by_name(name)

# bad
User.find_by_name_and_email(name)

# bad
User.find_by_email!(name)

# good
User.find_by(name: name)

# good
User.find_by(name: name, email: email)

# good
User.find_by!(email: email)
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