egonbraun/logmsg

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Method load has a Cognitive Complexity of 12 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

    def load
      close if @loaded

      @path.each do |file|
        next unless File.exist?(file)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb - About 1 hr to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Method unregister has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

    def unregister
      unless @logger.nil?
        @logger.close unless @path == STDOUT_STREAM || @path == STDERR_STREAM
        @logger = nil
      end
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/logfile.rb - About 25 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Use 2 spaces for indentation in a heredoc by using some library(e.g. ActiveSupport's String#strip_heredoc).
Open

logmsg [OPTIONS] ... MESSAGE

-h, --help:
   show this help message

Severity: Minor
Found in bin/logmsg by rubocop

This cops checks the indentation of the here document bodies. The bodies are indented one step. In Ruby 2.3 or newer, squiggly heredocs (<<~) should be used. If you use the older rubies, you should introduce some library to your project (e.g. ActiveSupport, Powerpack or Unindent). Note: When Metrics/LineLength's AllowHeredoc is false(not default), this cop does not add any offenses for long here documents to avoid Metrics/LineLength's offenses.

Example:

# bad
<

Prefer annotated tokens (like %<foo>s</foo>) over template tokens (like %{foo}).
Open

    DEFAULT_LOG_FORMAT = '%{progname} [%{datetime}] %{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb by rubocop

Use a consistent style for named format string tokens.

Note: unannotated style cop only works for strings which are passed as arguments to those methods: sprintf, format, %. The reason is that unannotated format is very similar to encoded URLs or Date/Time formatting strings.

Example: EnforcedStyle: annotated (default)

# bad
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: template

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: unannotated

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%{greeting}', 'Hello')

# good
format('%s', 'Hello')</greeting>

Freeze mutable objects assigned to constants.
Open

    DEFAULT_DATETIME_FORMAT = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb by rubocop

This cop checks whether some constant value isn't a mutable literal (e.g. array or hash).

Example:

# bad
CONST = [1, 2, 3]

# good
CONST = [1, 2, 3].freeze

required_ruby_version (2.2, declared in logmsg.gemspec) and TargetRubyVersion (2.1, declared in .rubocop.yml) should be equal.
Open

  spec.required_ruby_version = '>= 2.2.2'
Severity: Minor
Found in logmsg.gemspec by rubocop

Checks that required_ruby_version of gemspec and TargetRubyVersion of .rubocop.yml are equal. Thereby, RuboCop to perform static analysis working on the version required by gemspec.

Example:

# When `TargetRubyVersion` of .rubocop.yml is `2.3`.

# bad
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.required_ruby_version = '>= 2.2.0'
end

# bad
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.required_ruby_version = '>= 2.4.0'
end

# good
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.required_ruby_version = '>= 2.3.0'
end

# good
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.required_ruby_version = '>= 2.3'
end

# good
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.required_ruby_version = ['>= 2.3.0', '< 2.5.0']
end

Unnecessary utf-8 encoding comment.
Open

# coding: utf-8
Severity: Minor
Found in logmsg.gemspec by rubocop

Prefer annotated tokens (like %<foo>s</foo>) over template tokens (like %{foo}).
Open

    DEFAULT_LOG_FORMAT = '%{progname} [%{datetime}] %{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb by rubocop

Use a consistent style for named format string tokens.

Note: unannotated style cop only works for strings which are passed as arguments to those methods: sprintf, format, %. The reason is that unannotated format is very similar to encoded URLs or Date/Time formatting strings.

Example: EnforcedStyle: annotated (default)

# bad
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: template

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: unannotated

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%{greeting}', 'Hello')

# good
format('%s', 'Hello')</greeting>

Prefer annotated tokens (like %<foo>s</foo>) over template tokens (like %{foo}).
Open

    DEFAULT_LOG_FORMAT = '%{progname} [%{datetime}] %{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb by rubocop

Use a consistent style for named format string tokens.

Note: unannotated style cop only works for strings which are passed as arguments to those methods: sprintf, format, %. The reason is that unannotated format is very similar to encoded URLs or Date/Time formatting strings.

Example: EnforcedStyle: annotated (default)

# bad
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: template

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: unannotated

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%{greeting}', 'Hello')

# good
format('%s', 'Hello')</greeting>

Operator << should be surrounded by a single space.
Open

  spec.executables   << 'logmsg'
Severity: Minor
Found in logmsg.gemspec by rubocop

Checks that operators have space around them, except for ** which should not have surrounding space.

Example:

# bad
total = 3*4
"apple"+"juice"
my_number = 38/4
a ** b

# good
total = 3 * 4
"apple" + "juice"
my_number = 38 / 4
a**b

Use meaningful heredoc delimiters.
Open

  EOF
Severity: Minor
Found in bin/logmsg by rubocop

This cop checks that your heredocs are using meaningful delimiters. By default it disallows END and EO*, and can be configured through blacklisting additional delimiters.

Example:

# good
<

Freeze mutable objects assigned to constants.
Open

  VERSION = '1.0.6'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/version.rb by rubocop

This cop checks whether some constant value isn't a mutable literal (e.g. array or hash).

Example:

# bad
CONST = [1, 2, 3]

# good
CONST = [1, 2, 3].freeze

Favor format over String#%.
Open

        "#{@format}\n" % { severity: s, datetime: d, progname: p, msg: m }
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/logfile.rb by rubocop

This cop enforces the use of a single string formatting utility. Valid options include Kernel#format, Kernel#sprintf and String#%.

The detection of String#% cannot be implemented in a reliable manner for all cases, so only two scenarios are considered - if the first argument is a string literal and if the second argument is an array literal.

Example: EnforcedStyle: format(default)

# bad
puts sprintf('%10s', 'hoge')
puts '%10s' % 'hoge'

# good
puts format('%10s', 'hoge')

Example: EnforcedStyle: sprintf

# bad
puts format('%10s', 'hoge')
puts '%10s' % 'hoge'

# good
puts sprintf('%10s', 'hoge')

Example: EnforcedStyle: percent

# bad
puts format('%10s', 'hoge')
puts sprintf('%10s', 'hoge')

# good
puts '%10s' % 'hoge'

Prefer annotated tokens (like %<foo>s</foo>) over template tokens (like %{foo}).
Open

    DEFAULT_FORMAT = '%{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/logfile.rb by rubocop

Use a consistent style for named format string tokens.

Note: unannotated style cop only works for strings which are passed as arguments to those methods: sprintf, format, %. The reason is that unannotated format is very similar to encoded URLs or Date/Time formatting strings.

Example: EnforcedStyle: annotated (default)

# bad
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: template

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: unannotated

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%{greeting}', 'Hello')

# good
format('%s', 'Hello')</greeting>

Freeze mutable objects assigned to constants.
Open

    DEFAULT_FORMAT = '%{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/logfile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks whether some constant value isn't a mutable literal (e.g. array or hash).

Example:

# bad
CONST = [1, 2, 3]

# good
CONST = [1, 2, 3].freeze

Use @severities.length.zero? instead of @severities.length == 0.
Open

      severity >= @threshold && @severities.length == 0
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg/logfile.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for usage of comparison operators (==, >, <) to test numbers as zero, positive, or negative. These can be replaced by their respective predicate methods. The cop can also be configured to do the reverse.

The cop disregards #nonzero? as it its value is truthy or falsey, but not true and false, and thus not always interchangeable with != 0.

The cop ignores comparisons to global variables, since they are often populated with objects which can be compared with integers, but are not themselves Interger polymorphic.

Example: EnforcedStyle: predicate (default)

# bad

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

# good

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

Example: EnforcedStyle: comparison

# bad

foo.zero?
foo.negative?
bar.baz.positive?

# good

foo == 0
0 > foo
bar.baz > 0

Use empty? instead of length < 1.
Open

if ARGV.length < 1
Severity: Minor
Found in bin/logmsg by rubocop

This cop checks for numeric comparisons that can be replaced by a predicate method, such as receiver.length == 0, receiver.length > 0, receiver.length != 0, receiver.length < 1 and receiver.size == 0 that can be replaced by receiver.empty? and !receiver.empty.

Example:

# bad
[1, 2, 3].length == 0
0 == "foobar".length
array.length < 1
{a: 1, b: 2}.length != 0
string.length > 0
hash.size > 0

# good
[1, 2, 3].empty?
"foobar".empty?
array.empty?
!{a: 1, b: 2}.empty?
!string.empty?
!hash.empty?

Dependencies should be sorted in an alphabetical order within their section of the gemspec. Dependency byebug should appear before rspec.
Open

  spec.add_development_dependency 'byebug', '~> 8.2', '>= 8.2.1'
Severity: Minor
Found in logmsg.gemspec by rubocop

Dependencies in the gemspec should be alphabetically sorted.

Example:

# bad
spec.add_dependency 'rubocop'
spec.add_dependency 'rspec'

# good
spec.add_dependency 'rspec'
spec.add_dependency 'rubocop'

# good
spec.add_dependency 'rubocop'

spec.add_dependency 'rspec'

# bad
spec.add_development_dependency 'rubocop'
spec.add_development_dependency 'rspec'

# good
spec.add_development_dependency 'rspec'
spec.add_development_dependency 'rubocop'

# good
spec.add_development_dependency 'rubocop'

spec.add_development_dependency 'rspec'

# bad
spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rubocop'
spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rspec'

# good
spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rspec'
spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rubocop'

# good
spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rubocop'

spec.add_runtime_dependency 'rspec'

# good only if TreatCommentsAsGroupSeparators is true
# For code quality
spec.add_dependency 'rubocop'
# For tests
spec.add_dependency 'rspec'

Operator = should be surrounded by a single space.
Open

  spec.bindir        = 'bin'
Severity: Minor
Found in logmsg.gemspec by rubocop

Checks that operators have space around them, except for ** which should not have surrounding space.

Example:

# bad
total = 3*4
"apple"+"juice"
my_number = 38/4
a ** b

# good
total = 3 * 4
"apple" + "juice"
my_number = 38 / 4
a**b

Prefer annotated tokens (like %<foo>s</foo>) over template tokens (like %{foo}).
Open

    DEFAULT_LOG_FORMAT = '%{progname} [%{datetime}] %{severity}: %{msg}'
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/logmsg.rb by rubocop

Use a consistent style for named format string tokens.

Note: unannotated style cop only works for strings which are passed as arguments to those methods: sprintf, format, %. The reason is that unannotated format is very similar to encoded URLs or Date/Time formatting strings.

Example: EnforcedStyle: annotated (default)

# bad
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: template

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%s', 'Hello')

# good
format('%{greeting}', greeting: 'Hello')</greeting>

Example: EnforcedStyle: unannotated

# bad
format('%<greeting>s', greeting: 'Hello')
format('%{greeting}', 'Hello')

# good
format('%s', 'Hello')</greeting>
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