kotojs/kotojs

Method 'config' has a complexity of 13.
Open

  config(nameOrObject, value) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Limit Cyclomatic Complexity (complexity)

Cyclomatic complexity measures the number of linearly independent paths through a program's source code. This rule allows setting a cyclomatic complexity threshold.

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x; // 1st path
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1; // 2nd path
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at reducing code complexity by capping the amount of cyclomatic complexity allowed in a program. As such, it will warn when the cyclomatic complexity crosses the configured threshold (default is 20).

Examples of incorrect code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1;
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Examples of correct code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else {
        return 4;
    }
}

Options

Optionally, you may specify a max object property:

"complexity": ["error", 2]

is equivalent to

"complexity": ["error", { "max": 2 }]

Deprecated: the object property maximum is deprecated. Please use the property max instead.

When Not To Use It

If you can't determine an appropriate complexity limit for your code, then it's best to disable this rule.

Further Reading

Related Rules

Method 'config' has too many statements (35). Maximum allowed is 30.
Open

  config(nameOrObject, value) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

enforce a maximum number of statements allowed in function blocks (max-statements)

The max-statements rule allows you to specify the maximum number of statements allowed in a function.

function foo() {
  var bar = 1; // one statement
  var baz = 2; // two statements
  var qux = 3; // three statements
}

Rule Details

This rule enforces a maximum number of statements allowed in function blocks.

Options

This rule has a number or object option:

  • "max" (default 10) enforces a maximum number of statements allows in function blocks

Deprecated: The object property maximum is deprecated; please use the object property max instead.

This rule has an object option:

  • "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true ignores top-level functions

max

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "max": 10 } option:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;

  var foo11 = 11; // Too many.
}

let foo = () => {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;

  var foo11 = 11; // Too many.
};

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "max": 10 } option:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  return function () {

    // The number of statements in the inner function does not count toward the
    // statement maximum.

    return 42;
  };
}

let foo = () => {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  return function () {

    // The number of statements in the inner function does not count toward the
    // statement maximum.

    return 42;
  };
}

ignoreTopLevelFunctions

Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the { "max": 10 }, { "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true } options:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10, { "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true }]*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  var foo11 = 11;
}

Related Rules

Method 'draw' has a complexity of 10.
Open

  draw(data) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/layer.js by eslint

Limit Cyclomatic Complexity (complexity)

Cyclomatic complexity measures the number of linearly independent paths through a program's source code. This rule allows setting a cyclomatic complexity threshold.

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x; // 1st path
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1; // 2nd path
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at reducing code complexity by capping the amount of cyclomatic complexity allowed in a program. As such, it will warn when the cyclomatic complexity crosses the configured threshold (default is 20).

Examples of incorrect code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1;
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Examples of correct code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else {
        return 4;
    }
}

Options

Optionally, you may specify a max object property:

"complexity": ["error", 2]

is equivalent to

"complexity": ["error", { "max": 2 }]

Deprecated: the object property maximum is deprecated. Please use the property max instead.

When Not To Use It

If you can't determine an appropriate complexity limit for your code, then it's best to disable this rule.

Further Reading

Related Rules

Method 'draw' has too many statements (31). Maximum allowed is 30.
Open

  draw(data) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/layer.js by eslint

enforce a maximum number of statements allowed in function blocks (max-statements)

The max-statements rule allows you to specify the maximum number of statements allowed in a function.

function foo() {
  var bar = 1; // one statement
  var baz = 2; // two statements
  var qux = 3; // three statements
}

Rule Details

This rule enforces a maximum number of statements allowed in function blocks.

Options

This rule has a number or object option:

  • "max" (default 10) enforces a maximum number of statements allows in function blocks

Deprecated: The object property maximum is deprecated; please use the object property max instead.

This rule has an object option:

  • "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true ignores top-level functions

max

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "max": 10 } option:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;

  var foo11 = 11; // Too many.
}

let foo = () => {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;

  var foo11 = 11; // Too many.
};

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "max": 10 } option:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  return function () {

    // The number of statements in the inner function does not count toward the
    // statement maximum.

    return 42;
  };
}

let foo = () => {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  return function () {

    // The number of statements in the inner function does not count toward the
    // statement maximum.

    return 42;
  };
}

ignoreTopLevelFunctions

Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the { "max": 10 }, { "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true } options:

/*eslint max-statements: ["error", 10, { "ignoreTopLevelFunctions": true }]*/

function foo() {
  var foo1 = 1;
  var foo2 = 2;
  var foo3 = 3;
  var foo4 = 4;
  var foo5 = 5;
  var foo6 = 6;
  var foo7 = 7;
  var foo8 = 8;
  var foo9 = 9;
  var foo10 = 10;
  var foo11 = 11;
}

Related Rules

Unexpected require().
Open

      require('karma-webpack'),
Severity: Minor
Found in karma.conf.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

              definition.value = definition.setter.call(definition, nameOrObject[key]);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

        return definition.getter.call(definition);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

          definition.value = definition.setter.call(definition, value);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

        for (key in item) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see no-prototype-builtins.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

Further Reading

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

          for (key in init) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see no-prototype-builtins.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

Further Reading

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

          this.initialize.call(this);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected require().
Open

  require('./assert.spec.js')(kotoAssert);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected require().
Open

  require('./layer.spec.js')(Layer, Chart);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected require().
Open

  require('./chart.spec.js')(Chart);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/chart.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

The body of a for-in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.
Open

        for (var eventName in options.events) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/layer.js by eslint

Require Guarding for-in (guard-for-in)

Looping over objects with a for in loop will include properties that are inherited through the prototype chain. This behavior can lead to unexpected items in your for loop.

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Note that simply checking foo.hasOwnProperty(key) is likely to cause an error in some cases; see no-prototype-builtins.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at preventing unexpected behavior that could arise from using a for in loop without filtering the results in the loop. As such, it will warn when for in loops do not filter their results with an if statement.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    doSomething(key);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint guard-for-in: "error"*/

for (key in foo) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
    if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(foo, key)) {
        doSomething(key);
    }
}

Related Rules

Further Reading

Use path.join() or path.resolve() instead of + to create paths.
Open

  context: __dirname + '/src',
Severity: Minor
Found in webpack.config.js by eslint

Disallow string concatenation when using __dirname and __filename (no-path-concat)

In Node.js, the __dirname and __filename global variables contain the directory path and the file path of the currently executing script file, respectively. Sometimes, developers try to use these variables to create paths to other files, such as:

var fullPath = __dirname + "/foo.js";

However, there are a few problems with this. First, you can't be sure what type of system the script is running on. Node.js can be run on any computer, including Windows, which uses a different path separator. It's very easy, therefore, to create an invalid path using string concatenation and assuming Unix-style separators. There's also the possibility of having double separators, or otherwise ending up with an invalid path.

In order to avoid any confusion as to how to create the correct path, Node.js provides the path module. This module uses system-specific information to always return the correct value. So you can rewrite the previous example as:

var fullPath = path.join(__dirname, "foo.js");

This example doesn't need to include separators as path.join() will do it in the most appropriate manner. Alternately, you can use path.resolve() to retrieve the fully-qualified path:

var fullPath = path.resolve(__dirname, "foo.js");

Both path.join() and path.resolve() are suitable replacements for string concatenation wherever file or directory paths are being created.

Rule Details

This rule aims to prevent string concatenation of directory paths in Node.js

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-path-concat: "error"*/

var fullPath = __dirname + "/foo.js";

var fullPath = __filename + "/foo.js";

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-path-concat: "error"*/

var fullPath = dirname + "/foo.js";

When Not To Use It

If you want to allow string concatenation of path names. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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