michaelherold/codeclimate-haml-lint

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CC::Engine::Fingerprint#to_s has approx 6 statements
Open

      def to_s
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/fingerprint.rb by reek

A method with Too Many Statements is any method that has a large number of lines.

Too Many Statements warns about any method that has more than 5 statements. Reek's smell detector for Too Many Statements counts +1 for every simple statement in a method and +1 for every statement within a control structure (if, else, case, when, for, while, until, begin, rescue) but it doesn't count the control structure itself.

So the following method would score +6 in Reek's statement-counting algorithm:

def parse(arg, argv, &error)
  if !(val = arg) and (argv.empty? or /\A-/ =~ (val = argv[0]))
    return nil, block, nil                                         # +1
  end
  opt = (val = parse_arg(val, &error))[1]                          # +2
  val = conv_arg(*val)                                             # +3
  if opt and !arg
    argv.shift                                                     # +4
  else
    val[0] = nil                                                   # +5
  end
  val                                                              # +6
end

(You might argue that the two assigments within the first @if@ should count as statements, and that perhaps the nested assignment should count as +2.)

CC::Engine::Issue#initialize has 6 parameters
Open

      def initialize(linter_name:, location:, message:, path:, root: '', severity:)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/issue.rb by reek

A Long Parameter List occurs when a method has a lot of parameters.

Example

Given

class Dummy
  def long_list(foo,bar,baz,fling,flung)
    puts foo,bar,baz,fling,flung
  end
end

Reek would report the following warning:

test.rb -- 1 warning:
  [2]:Dummy#long_list has 5 parameters (LongParameterList)

A common solution to this problem would be the introduction of parameter objects.

CC::Engine::HamlLint#initialize is controlled by argument 'engine_config'
Open

        @engine_config = engine_config || CC::Engine::Configuration.new
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/haml_lint.rb by reek

Control Parameter is a special case of Control Couple

Example

A simple example would be the "quoted" parameter in the following method:

def write(quoted)
  if quoted
    write_quoted @value
  else
    write_unquoted @value
  end
end

Fixing those problems is out of the scope of this document but an easy solution could be to remove the "write" method alltogether and to move the calls to "writequoted" / "writeunquoted" in the initial caller of "write".

CC::Engine::ReportAdapter#create_issues_from refers to 'analysis' more than self (maybe move it to another class?)
Open

        analysis[:offenses].map do |offense|
          Issue.new(offense.merge(path: analysis[:path], root: root))
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/report_adapter.rb by reek

Feature Envy occurs when a code fragment references another object more often than it references itself, or when several clients do the same series of manipulations on a particular type of object.

Feature Envy reduces the code's ability to communicate intent: code that "belongs" on one class but which is located in another can be hard to find, and may upset the "System of Names" in the host class.

Feature Envy also affects the design's flexibility: A code fragment that is in the wrong class creates couplings that may not be natural within the application's domain, and creates a loss of cohesion in the unwilling host class.

Feature Envy often arises because it must manipulate other objects (usually its arguments) to get them into a useful form, and one force preventing them (the arguments) doing this themselves is that the common knowledge lives outside the arguments, or the arguments are of too basic a type to justify extending that type. Therefore there must be something which 'knows' about the contents or purposes of the arguments. That thing would have to be more than just a basic type, because the basic types are either containers which don't know about their contents, or they are single objects which can't capture their relationship with their fellows of the same type. So, this thing with the extra knowledge should be reified into a class, and the utility method will most likely belong there.

Example

Running Reek on:

class Warehouse
  def sale_price(item)
    (item.price - item.rebate) * @vat
  end
end

would report:

Warehouse#total_price refers to item more than self (FeatureEnvy)

since this:

(item.price - item.rebate)

belongs to the Item class, not the Warehouse.

CC::Engine::Location#to_h calls '{}.tap' 2 times
Open

        {}.tap do |hash|
          hash[:path] = path
          hash[:lines] = {}.tap do |lines|
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/location.rb by reek

Duplication occurs when two fragments of code look nearly identical, or when two fragments of code have nearly identical effects at some conceptual level.

Reek implements a check for Duplicate Method Call.

Example

Here's a very much simplified and contrived example. The following method will report a warning:

def double_thing()
  @other.thing + @other.thing
end

One quick approach to silence Reek would be to refactor the code thus:

def double_thing()
  thing = @other.thing
  thing + thing
end

A slightly different approach would be to replace all calls of double_thing by calls to @other.double_thing:

class Other
  def double_thing()
    thing + thing
  end
end

The approach you take will depend on balancing other factors in your code.

CC::Engine::Issue#to_h calls '__send__(field)' 2 times
Open

            hash[field] = __send__(field) unless __send__(field).empty?
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/issue.rb by reek

Duplication occurs when two fragments of code look nearly identical, or when two fragments of code have nearly identical effects at some conceptual level.

Reek implements a check for Duplicate Method Call.

Example

Here's a very much simplified and contrived example. The following method will report a warning:

def double_thing()
  @other.thing + @other.thing
end

One quick approach to silence Reek would be to refactor the code thus:

def double_thing()
  thing = @other.thing
  thing + thing
end

A slightly different approach would be to replace all calls of double_thing by calls to @other.double_thing:

class Other
  def double_thing()
    thing + thing
  end
end

The approach you take will depend on balancing other factors in your code.

CC::Engine::HamlLint#base_config calls 'engine_config.config' 2 times
Open

        if engine_config.config
          ::HamlLint::ConfigurationLoader.load_file(engine_config.config)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/haml_lint.rb by reek

Duplication occurs when two fragments of code look nearly identical, or when two fragments of code have nearly identical effects at some conceptual level.

Reek implements a check for Duplicate Method Call.

Example

Here's a very much simplified and contrived example. The following method will report a warning:

def double_thing()
  @other.thing + @other.thing
end

One quick approach to silence Reek would be to refactor the code thus:

def double_thing()
  thing = @other.thing
  thing + thing
end

A slightly different approach would be to replace all calls of double_thing by calls to @other.double_thing:

class Other
  def double_thing()
    thing + thing
  end
end

The approach you take will depend on balancing other factors in your code.

CC::Engine::Fingerprint#to_s has the variable name 'md5'
Open

        md5 = Digest::MD5.new
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/fingerprint.rb by reek

An Uncommunicative Variable Name is a variable name that doesn't communicate its intent well enough.

Poor names make it hard for the reader to build a mental picture of what's going on in the code. They can also be mis-interpreted; and they hurt the flow of reading, because the reader must slow down to interpret the names.

Re-enable Metrics/ParameterLists cop with # rubocop:enable after disabling it.
Open

      # rubocop:disable Metrics/ParameterLists
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cc/engine/issue.rb by rubocop
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