neo4jrb/neo4j

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lib/active_graph/node/has_n/association.rb

Summary

Maintainability
B
6 hrs
Test Coverage

Class Association has 34 methods (exceeds 20 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

      class Association
        include ActiveGraph::Shared::RelTypeConverters
        include ActiveGraph::Node::Dependent::AssociationMethods
        include ActiveGraph::Node::HasN::AssociationCypherMethods

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/active_graph/node/has_n/association.rb - About 4 hrs to fix

Method target_class_option has a Cognitive Complexity of 8 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

        def target_class_option(model_class)
          case model_class
          when nil
            @target_class_name_from_name ? "#{association_model_namespace}::#{@target_class_name_from_name}" : @target_class_name_from_name
          when Array
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/active_graph/node/has_n/association.rb - About 45 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Method derive_model_class has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

        def derive_model_class
          refresh_model_class! if pending_model_refresh?
          return @model_class unless @model_class.nil?
          return nil if relationship_class.nil?
          dir_class = direction == :in ? :from_class : :to_class
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/active_graph/node/has_n/association.rb - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Method get_direction has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

        def get_direction(create, reverse = false)
          dir = (create && @direction == :both) ? :out : @direction
          if reverse
            case dir
            when :in then :out
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/active_graph/node/has_n/association.rb - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Do not use empty case condition, instead use an if expression.
Open

          message = case

This cop checks for case statements with an empty condition.

Example:

# bad:
case
when x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
when y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good:
if x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
elsif y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good: (the case condition node is not empty)
case n
when 0
  puts 'zero'
when 1
  puts 'one'
else
  puts 'more'
end

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

          @relationship_type = options[:type] && options[:type].to_sym

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

Do not use empty case condition, instead use an if expression.
Open

          case

This cop checks for case statements with an empty condition.

Example:

# bad:
case
when x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
when y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good:
if x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
elsif y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good: (the case condition node is not empty)
case n
when 0
  puts 'zero'
when 1
  puts 'one'
else
  puts 'more'
end

Missing magic comment # frozen_string_literal: true.
Open

require 'active_support/inflector/inflections'

This cop is designed to help upgrade to Ruby 3.0. It will add the comment # frozen_string_literal: true to the top of files to enable frozen string literals. Frozen string literals may be default in Ruby 3.0. The comment will be added below a shebang and encoding comment. The frozen string literal comment is only valid in Ruby 2.3+.

Example: EnforcedStyle: when_needed (default)

# The `when_needed` style will add the frozen string literal comment
# to files only when the `TargetRubyVersion` is set to 2.3+.
# bad
module Foo
  # ...
end

# good
# frozen_string_literal: true

module Foo
  # ...
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: always

# The `always` style will always add the frozen string literal comment
# to a file, regardless of the Ruby version or if `freeze` or `<<` are
# called on a string literal.
# bad
module Bar
  # ...
end

# good
# frozen_string_literal: true

module Bar
  # ...
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: never

# The `never` will enforce that the frozen string literal comment does
# not exist in a file.
# bad
# frozen_string_literal: true

module Baz
  # ...
end

# good
module Baz
  # ...
end

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

          @origin = options[:origin] && options[:origin].to_sym

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

Omit parentheses for ternary conditions.
Open

          dir = (create && @direction == :both) ? :out : @direction

This cop checks for the presence of parentheses around ternary conditions. It is configurable to enforce inclusion or omission of parentheses using EnforcedStyle. Omission is only enforced when removing the parentheses won't cause a different behavior.

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses (default)

# bad
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

# good
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses

# bad
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

# good
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

Example: EnforcedStyle: requireparentheseswhen_complex

# bad
foo = (bar?) ? a : b
foo = (bar.baz?) ? a : b
foo = bar && baz ? a : b

# good
foo = bar? ? a : b
foo = bar.baz? ? a : b
foo = (bar && baz) ? a : b

Useless private access modifier.
Open

        private

This cop checks for redundant access modifiers, including those with no code, those which are repeated, and leading public modifiers in a class or module body. Conditionally-defined methods are considered as always being defined, and thus access modifiers guarding such methods are not redundant.

Example:

class Foo
  public # this is redundant (default access is public)

  def method
  end

  private # this is not redundant (a method is defined)
  def method2
  end

  private # this is redundant (no following methods are defined)
end

Example:

class Foo
  # The following is not redundant (conditionally defined methods are
  # considered as always defining a method)
  private

  if condition?
    def method
    end
  end

  protected # this is not redundant (method is defined)

  define_method(:method2) do
  end

  protected # this is redundant (repeated from previous modifier)

  [1,2,3].each do |i|
    define_method("foo#{i}") do
    end
  end

  # The following is redundant (methods defined on the class'
  # singleton class are not affected by the public modifier)
  public

  def self.method3
  end
end

Example:

# Lint/UselessAccessModifier:
#   ContextCreatingMethods:
#     - concerning
require 'active_support/concern'
class Foo
  concerning :Bar do
    def some_public_method
    end

    private

    def some_private_method
    end
  end

  # this is not redundant because `concerning` created its own context
  private

  def some_other_private_method
  end
end

Example:

# Lint/UselessAccessModifier:
#   MethodCreatingMethods:
#     - delegate
require 'active_support/core_ext/module/delegation'
class Foo
  # this is not redundant because `delegate` creates methods
  private

  delegate :method_a, to: :method_b
end

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

          @relationship_class ||= @relationship_class_name && @relationship_class_name.constantize

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

Do not use empty case condition, instead use an if expression.
Open

          message = case

This cop checks for case statements with an empty condition.

Example:

# bad:
case
when x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
when y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good:
if x == 0
  puts 'x is 0'
elsif y == 0
  puts 'y is 0'
else
  puts 'neither is 0'
end

# good: (the case condition node is not empty)
case n
when 0
  puts 'zero'
when 1
  puts 'one'
else
  puts 'more'
end

Favor modifier if usage when having a single-line body. Another good alternative is the usage of control flow &&/||. (https://github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide#if-as-a-modifier)
Open

            if options[key1] && options[key2]

Checks for if and unless statements that would fit on one line if written as a modifier if/unless. The maximum line length is configured in the Metrics/LineLength cop.

Example:

# bad
if condition
  do_stuff(bar)
end

unless qux.empty?
  Foo.do_something
end

# good
do_stuff(bar) if condition
Foo.do_something unless qux.empty?

Use safe navigation (&.) instead of checking if an object exists before calling the method.
Open

          target_class && target_class.associations[@origin]

This cop transforms usages of a method call safeguarded by a non nil check for the variable whose method is being called to safe navigation (&.).

Configuration option: ConvertCodeThatCanStartToReturnNil The default for this is false. When configured to true, this will check for code in the format !foo.nil? && foo.bar. As it is written, the return of this code is limited to false and whatever the return of the method is. If this is converted to safe navigation, foo&.bar can start returning nil as well as what the method returns.

Example:

# bad
foo.bar if foo
foo.bar(param1, param2) if foo
foo.bar { |e| e.something } if foo
foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something } if foo

foo.bar if !foo.nil?
foo.bar unless !foo
foo.bar unless foo.nil?

foo && foo.bar
foo && foo.bar(param1, param2)
foo && foo.bar { |e| e.something }
foo && foo.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

# good
foo&.bar
foo&.bar(param1, param2)
foo&.bar { |e| e.something }
foo&.bar(param) { |e| e.something }

foo.nil? || foo.bar
!foo || foo.bar

# Methods that `nil` will `respond_to?` should not be converted to
# use safe navigation
foo.to_i if foo

There are no issues that match your filters.

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