shellspec/shellspec

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contrib/check.sh

Summary

Maintainability
Test Coverage

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

count total $(sources; helpers; specs; examples)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

count example $(examples)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

docker run -i --rm "$tag" shellcheck -C $(sources; helpers; specs; examples)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

count helper $(helpers)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Use own script or sh -c '..' to run this from find.
Open

examples() {
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Use own script or sh -c '..' to run this from su.

See [[SC2033]].

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Shell functions can't be passed to external commands.
Open

  find examples -name '*.sh'
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Shell functions can't be passed to external commands.

Problematic code:

foo() { bar --baz "$@"; frob --baz "$@"; };
find . -exec foo {} +

Correct code:

find . -exec sh -c 'bar --baz "$@"; frob --baz "$@";' -- {} +

Rationale:

Shell functions are only known to the shell. External commands like find, xargs, su and sudo do not recognize shell functions.

Instead, the function contents can be executed in a shell, either through sh -c or by creating a separate shell script as an executable file.

Exceptions

If you're intentionally passing a word that happens to have the same name as a declared function, you can quote it to make shellcheck ignore it, e.g.

nobody() {
  sudo -u "nobody" "$@"
}

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

wc -lc $(sources; helpers; specs; examples) | nl | sed '$d'
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

count source $(sources)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

count spec $(specs)
Severity: Minor
Found in contrib/check.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto. An alternative is to put the variables to an array and expand it:

args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) )
gcc "${args[@]}" client.c

The power of using an array becomes evident when you want to combine, for example, the command result with user-provided arguments:

compile () {
    args=( $(pkg-config --libs openssl) "${@}" )
    gcc "${args[@]}" client.c
}
compile -DDEBUG
+ gcc -lssl -lcrypto -DDEBUG client.c

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

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