steve-jansen/json-proxy

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Showing 21 of 21 total issues

Function 'parseConfig' has a complexity of 10.
Open

function parseConfig(contents, config) {
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js by eslint

Limit Cyclomatic Complexity (complexity)

Cyclomatic complexity measures the number of linearly independent paths through a program's source code. This rule allows setting a cyclomatic complexity threshold.

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x; // 1st path
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1; // 2nd path
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at reducing code complexity by capping the amount of cyclomatic complexity allowed in a program. As such, it will warn when the cyclomatic complexity crosses the configured threshold (default is 20).

Examples of incorrect code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else if (false) {
        return x+1;
    } else {
        return 4; // 3rd path
    }
}

Examples of correct code for a maximum of 2:

/*eslint complexity: ["error", 2]*/

function a(x) {
    if (true) {
        return x;
    } else {
        return 4;
    }
}

Options

Optionally, you may specify a max object property:

"complexity": ["error", 2]

is equivalent to

"complexity": ["error", { "max": 2 }]

Deprecated: the object property maximum is deprecated. Please use the property max instead.

When Not To Use It

If you can't determine an appropriate complexity limit for your code, then it's best to disable this rule.

Further Reading

Related Rules

  • [max-depth](max-depth.md)
  • [max-len](max-len.md)
  • [max-nested-callbacks](max-nested-callbacks.md)
  • [max-params](max-params.md)
  • [max-statements](max-statements.md) Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Function optimist has 50 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function optimist() {
  var usage = [
    pkginfo.name + ' v' + pkginfo.version,
    '',
    'A utility for UI developers to proxy JSON API calls to remote servers',
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cli.js - About 2 hrs to fix

Function parseCommandLine has 41 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function parseCommandLine(argv, config) {
  if (argv) {
    // read the command line arguments if no config file was given
    parseCommandLineArgument(argv.port, function(item){
      config.server.port = item;
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js - About 1 hr to fix

Function proxyRequest has 27 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function proxyRequest(req, res, rule) {
  var router,
      target,
      path;

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js - About 1 hr to fix

Function parseFile has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function parseFile(filepath, config) {
  var contents;

  filepath = filepath || path.join(process.cwd(), '/json-proxy.json');

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Function parseEnv has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function parseEnv(config) {
  var env = process.env;
  var temp;

  if (env['JSON_PROXY_PORT']) {
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Function initialize has a Cognitive Complexity of 7 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

exports.initialize = function initialize(options){
  logger = options.logger || require('./logger');
  config = configParser(options).proxy;
  useGateway = (config.gateway !== null && typeof(config.gateway) === 'object' && typeof(config.gateway.host) === 'string');

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js - About 35 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Function parseTargetServer has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function parseTargetServer(value) {
  var target,
      path;

  // insert a http protocol handler if not found in the string
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js - About 25 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Function parseCommandLineArgument has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function parseCommandLineArgument(arg, fn) {
  if (typeof(fn) !== 'function')
    return;

  if (Array.isArray(arg)) {
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js - About 25 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Function proxyRequest has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

function proxyRequest(req, res, rule) {
  var router,
      target,
      path;

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js - About 25 mins to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Unexpected require().
Open

    require('optimist').showHelp();
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cli.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected require().
Open

  logger = options.logger || require('./logger');
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected return with your callback function.
Open

      next();
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js by eslint

Enforce Return After Callback (callback-return)

The callback pattern is at the heart of most I/O and event-driven programming in JavaScript.

function doSomething(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        return callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

To prevent calling the callback multiple times it is important to return anytime the callback is triggered outside of the main function body. Neglecting this technique often leads to issues where you do something more than once. For example, in the case of an HTTP request, you may try to send HTTP headers more than once leading Node.js to throw a Can't render headers after they are sent to the client. error.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at ensuring that callbacks used outside of the main function block are always part-of or immediately preceding a return statement. This rule decides what is a callback based on the name of the function being called.

Options

The rule takes a single option - an array of possible callback names - which may include object methods. The default callback names are callback, cb, next.

Default callback names

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default ["callback", "cb", "next"] option:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default ["callback", "cb", "next"] option:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        return callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

Supplied callback names

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the option ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]:

/*eslint callback-return: ["error", ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]]*/

function foo(err, done) {
    if (err) {
        done(err);
    }
    done();
}

function bar(err, send) {
    if (err) {
        send.error(err);
    }
    send.success();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the option ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]:

/*eslint callback-return: ["error", ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]]*/

function foo(err, done) {
    if (err) {
        return done(err);
    }
    done();
}

function bar(err, send) {
    if (err) {
        return send.error(err);
    }
    send.success();
}

Known Limitations

Because it is difficult to understand the meaning of a program through static analysis, this rule has limitations:

  • false negatives when this rule reports correct code, but the program calls the callback more than one time (which is incorrect behavior)
  • false positives when this rule reports incorrect code, but the program calls the callback only one time (which is correct behavior)

Passing the callback by reference

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback if it is an argument of a function (for example, setTimeout).

Example of a false negative when this rule reports correct code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        setTimeout(callback, 0); // this is bad, but WILL NOT warn
    }
    callback();
}

Triggering the callback within a nested function

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback from within a nested function or an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE).

Example of a false negative when this rule reports correct code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        process.nextTick(function() {
            return callback(); // this is bad, but WILL NOT warn
        });
    }
    callback();
}

If/else statements

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback only one time in each branch of an if statement.

Example of a false positive when this rule reports incorrect code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        callback(err); // this is fine, but WILL warn
    } else {
        callback();    // this is fine, but WILL warn
    }
}

When Not To Use It

There are some cases where you might want to call a callback function more than once. In those cases this rule may lead to incorrect behavior. In those cases you may want to reserve a special name for those callbacks and not include that in the list of callbacks that trigger warnings.

Further Reading

Related Rules

Expected return with your callback function.
Open

      result.push(callback(property, map[property]));
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js by eslint

Enforce Return After Callback (callback-return)

The callback pattern is at the heart of most I/O and event-driven programming in JavaScript.

function doSomething(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        return callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

To prevent calling the callback multiple times it is important to return anytime the callback is triggered outside of the main function body. Neglecting this technique often leads to issues where you do something more than once. For example, in the case of an HTTP request, you may try to send HTTP headers more than once leading Node.js to throw a Can't render headers after they are sent to the client. error.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at ensuring that callbacks used outside of the main function block are always part-of or immediately preceding a return statement. This rule decides what is a callback based on the name of the function being called.

Options

The rule takes a single option - an array of possible callback names - which may include object methods. The default callback names are callback, cb, next.

Default callback names

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default ["callback", "cb", "next"] option:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default ["callback", "cb", "next"] option:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        return callback(err);
    }
    callback();
}

Supplied callback names

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the option ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]:

/*eslint callback-return: ["error", ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]]*/

function foo(err, done) {
    if (err) {
        done(err);
    }
    done();
}

function bar(err, send) {
    if (err) {
        send.error(err);
    }
    send.success();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the option ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]:

/*eslint callback-return: ["error", ["done", "send.error", "send.success"]]*/

function foo(err, done) {
    if (err) {
        return done(err);
    }
    done();
}

function bar(err, send) {
    if (err) {
        return send.error(err);
    }
    send.success();
}

Known Limitations

Because it is difficult to understand the meaning of a program through static analysis, this rule has limitations:

  • false negatives when this rule reports correct code, but the program calls the callback more than one time (which is incorrect behavior)
  • false positives when this rule reports incorrect code, but the program calls the callback only one time (which is correct behavior)

Passing the callback by reference

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback if it is an argument of a function (for example, setTimeout).

Example of a false negative when this rule reports correct code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        setTimeout(callback, 0); // this is bad, but WILL NOT warn
    }
    callback();
}

Triggering the callback within a nested function

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback from within a nested function or an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE).

Example of a false negative when this rule reports correct code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        process.nextTick(function() {
            return callback(); // this is bad, but WILL NOT warn
        });
    }
    callback();
}

If/else statements

The static analysis of this rule does not detect that the program calls the callback only one time in each branch of an if statement.

Example of a false positive when this rule reports incorrect code:

/*eslint callback-return: "error"*/

function foo(err, callback) {
    if (err) {
        callback(err); // this is fine, but WILL warn
    } else {
        callback();    // this is fine, but WILL warn
    }
}

When Not To Use It

There are some cases where you might want to call a callback function more than once. In those cases this rule may lead to incorrect behavior. In those cases you may want to reserve a special name for those callbacks and not include that in the list of callbacks that trigger warnings.

Further Reading

Related Rules

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

      fn.call(null, arg);
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected require().
Open

  var argv = require('optimist')
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cli.js by eslint

Enforce require() on the top-level module scope (global-require)

In Node.js, module dependencies are included using the require() function, such as:

var fs = require("fs");

While require() may be called anywhere in code, some style guides prescribe that it should be called only in the top level of a module to make it easier to identify dependencies. For instance, it's arguably harder to identify dependencies when they are deeply nested inside of functions and other statements:

function foo() {

    if (condition) {
        var fs = require("fs");
    }
}

Since require() does a synchronous load, it can cause performance problems when used in other locations.

Further, ES6 modules mandate that import and export statements can only occur in the top level of the module's body.

Rule Details

This rule requires all calls to require() to be at the top level of the module, similar to ES6 import and export statements, which also can occur only at the top level.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

// calling require() inside of a function is not allowed
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// conditional requires like this are also not allowed
if (DEBUG) { require('debug'); }

// a require() in a switch statement is also flagged
switch(x) { case '1': require('1'); break; }

// you may not require() inside an arrow function body
var getModule = (name) => require(name);

// you may not require() inside of a function body as well
function getModule(name) { return require(name); }

// you may not require() inside of a try/catch block
try {
    require(unsafeModule);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint global-require: "error"*/

// all these variations of require() are ok
require('x');
var y = require('y');
var z;
z = require('z').initialize();

// requiring a module and using it in a function is ok
var fs = require('fs');
function readFile(filename, callback) {
    fs.readFile(filename, callback)
}

// you can use a ternary to determine which module to require
var logger = DEBUG ? require('dev-logger') : require('logger');

// if you want you can require() at the end of your module
function doSomethingA() {}
function doSomethingB() {}
var x = require("x"),
    z = require("z");

When Not To Use It

If you have a module that must be initialized with information that comes from the file-system or if a module is only used in very rare situations and will cause significant overhead to load it may make sense to disable the rule. If you need to require() an optional dependency inside of a try/catch, you can disable this rule for just that dependency using the // eslint-disable-line global-require comment. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

      fn.call(null, item);
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/config.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

unnecessary '.call()'.
Open

      value = value.call(undefined, req);
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/proxy.js by eslint

Disallow unnecessary .call() and .apply(). (no-useless-call)

The function invocation can be written by Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply(). But Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() are slower than the normal function invocation.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed to flag usage of Function.prototype.call() and Function.prototype.apply() that can be replaced with the normal function invocation.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// These are same as `foo(1, 2, 3);`
foo.call(undefined, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(undefined, [1, 2, 3]);
foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);

// These are same as `obj.foo(1, 2, 3);`
obj.foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

// The `this` binding is different.
foo.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);
foo.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(null, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(null, [1, 2, 3]);
obj.foo.call(otherObj, 1, 2, 3);
obj.foo.apply(otherObj, [1, 2, 3]);

// The argument list is variadic.
foo.apply(undefined, args);
foo.apply(null, args);
obj.foo.apply(obj, args);

Known Limitations

This rule compares code statically to check whether or not thisArg is changed. So if the code about thisArg is a dynamic expression, this rule cannot judge correctly.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[i++].foo.call(a[i++], 1, 2, 3);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-useless-call: "error"*/

a[++i].foo.call(a[i], 1, 2, 3);

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unnecessary .call() and .apply(), you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Don't use process.exit(); throw an error instead.
Open

    process.exit(-1);
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cli.js by eslint

Disallow process.exit() (no-process-exit)

The process.exit() method in Node.js is used to immediately stop the Node.js process and exit. This is a dangerous operation because it can occur in any method at any point in time, potentially stopping a Node.js application completely when an error occurs. For example:

if (somethingBadHappened) {
    console.error("Something bad happened!");
    process.exit(1);
}

This code could appear in any module and will stop the entire application when somethingBadHappened is truthy. This doesn't give the application any chance to respond to the error. It's usually better to throw an error and allow the application to handle it appropriately:

if (somethingBadHappened) {
    throw new Error("Something bad happened!");
}

By throwing an error in this way, other parts of the application have an opportunity to handle the error rather than stopping the application altogether. If the error bubbles all the way up to the process without being handled, then the process will exit and a non-zero exit code will returned, so the end result is the same.

Rule Details

This rule aims to prevent the use of process.exit() in Node.js JavaScript. As such, it warns whenever process.exit() is found in code.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-process-exit: "error"*/

process.exit(1);
process.exit(0);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-process-exit: "error"*/

Process.exit();
var exit = process.exit;

When Not To Use It

There may be a part of a Node.js application that is responsible for determining the correct exit code to return upon exiting. In that case, you should turn this rule off to allow proper handling of the exit code. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Don't use process.exit(); throw an error instead.
Open

    process.exit(0);
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/cli.js by eslint

Disallow process.exit() (no-process-exit)

The process.exit() method in Node.js is used to immediately stop the Node.js process and exit. This is a dangerous operation because it can occur in any method at any point in time, potentially stopping a Node.js application completely when an error occurs. For example:

if (somethingBadHappened) {
    console.error("Something bad happened!");
    process.exit(1);
}

This code could appear in any module and will stop the entire application when somethingBadHappened is truthy. This doesn't give the application any chance to respond to the error. It's usually better to throw an error and allow the application to handle it appropriately:

if (somethingBadHappened) {
    throw new Error("Something bad happened!");
}

By throwing an error in this way, other parts of the application have an opportunity to handle the error rather than stopping the application altogether. If the error bubbles all the way up to the process without being handled, then the process will exit and a non-zero exit code will returned, so the end result is the same.

Rule Details

This rule aims to prevent the use of process.exit() in Node.js JavaScript. As such, it warns whenever process.exit() is found in code.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-process-exit: "error"*/

process.exit(1);
process.exit(0);

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-process-exit: "error"*/

Process.exit();
var exit = process.exit;

When Not To Use It

There may be a part of a Node.js application that is responsible for determining the correct exit code to return upon exiting. In that case, you should turn this rule off to allow proper handling of the exit code. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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