thoughtbot/paperclip

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lib/paperclip/matchers/validate_attachment_content_type_matcher.rb

Summary

Maintainability
A
40 mins
Test Coverage

Similar blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

        def accepted_types_and_failures
          if @allowed_types.present?
            "Accept content types: #{@allowed_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|
              if @missing_allowed_types.present?
                message << "  #{@missing_allowed_types.join(", ")} were rejected."
lib/paperclip/matchers/validate_attachment_content_type_matcher.rb on lines 66..72

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 28.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Similar blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

        def rejected_types_and_failures
          if @rejected_types.present?
            "Reject content types: #{@rejected_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|
              if @missing_rejected_types.present?
                message << "  #{@missing_rejected_types.join(", ")} were accepted."
lib/paperclip/matchers/validate_attachment_content_type_matcher.rb on lines 55..61

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 28.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Line is too long. [84/80]
Open

            "Reject content types: #{@rejected_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|

Use empty lines between method definitions.
Open

        def rejected_types_and_failures

This cop checks whether method definitions are separated by one empty line.

NumberOfEmptyLines can be and integer (e.g. 1 by default) or an array (e.g. [1, 2]) to specificy a minimum and a maximum of empty lines.

AllowAdjacentOneLineDefs can be used to configure is adjacent one line methods definitions are an offense

Example:

# bad
def a
end
def b
end

Example:

# good
def a
end

def b
end

Use the return of the conditional for variable assignment and comparison.
Open

              if @missing_rejected_types.present?
                message << "  #{@missing_rejected_types.join(", ")} were accepted."
              else
                message << "  All were rejected successfully."
              end

Use 2 (not 0) spaces for indenting an expression spanning multiple lines.
Open

          allowed_types_allowed? && rejected_types_rejected?

This cop checks the indentation of the right hand side operand in binary operations that span more than one line.

Example:

# bad
if a +
b
  something
end

# good
if a +
   b
  something
end

Use the return of the conditional for variable assignment and comparison.
Open

              if @missing_allowed_types.present?
                message << "  #{@missing_allowed_types.join(", ")} were rejected."
              else
                message << "  All were accepted successfully."
              end

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

      def validate_attachment_content_type name

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Line is too long. [82/80]
Open

                message << "  #{@missing_allowed_types.join(", ")} were rejected."

Line is too long. [89/80]
Open

          @missing_allowed_types ||= @allowed_types.reject { |type| type_allowed?(type) }

Line is too long. [91/80]
Open

          @missing_rejected_types ||= @rejected_types.select { |type| type_allowed?(type) }

Prefer single-quoted strings inside interpolations.
Open

                message << "  #{@missing_rejected_types.join(", ")} were accepted."

This cop checks that quotes inside the string interpolation match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

Line is too long. [83/80]
Open

                message << "  #{@missing_rejected_types.join(", ")} were accepted."

Line is too long. [83/80]
Open

            "Accept content types: #{@allowed_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

        def rejecting *types

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Prefer single-quoted strings inside interpolations.
Open

            "Reject content types: #{@rejected_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|

This cop checks that quotes inside the string interpolation match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

        def allowing *types

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Prefer single-quoted strings inside interpolations.
Open

                message << "  #{@missing_allowed_types.join(", ")} were rejected."

This cop checks that quotes inside the string interpolation match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

Prefer single-quoted strings inside interpolations.
Open

            "Accept content types: #{@allowed_types.join(", ")}\n".tap do |message|

This cop checks that quotes inside the string interpolation match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
result = "Tests #{success ? 'PASS' : 'FAIL'}"

# good
result = "Tests #{success ? "PASS" : "FAIL"}"

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

        def initialize attachment_name

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Use def with parentheses when there are parameters.
Open

        def matches? subject

This cops checks for parentheses around the arguments in method definitions. Both instance and class/singleton methods are checked.

Example: EnforcedStyle: require_parentheses (default)

# The `require_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to always use parentheses

# bad
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparentheses

# The `require_no_parentheses` style requires method definitions
# to never use parentheses

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

Example: EnforcedStyle: requirenoparenthesesexceptmultiline

# The `require_no_parentheses_except_multiline` style prefers no
# parantheses when method definition arguments fit on single line,
# but prefers parantheses when arguments span multiple lines.

# bad
def bar(num1, num2)
  num1 + num2
end

def foo descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name
  do_something
end

# good
def bar num1, num2
  num1 + num2
end

def foo(descriptive_var_name,
        another_descriptive_var_name,
        last_descriptive_var_name)
  do_something
end

Line is too long. [84/80]
Open

            message << "\n\n" if @allowed_types.present? && @rejected_types.present?

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