thoughtbot/paperclip

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lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb

Summary

Maintainability
A
2 hrs
Test Coverage

Assignment Branch Condition size for validate_each is too high. [22.2/15]
Open

      def validate_each(record, attr_name, value)
        base_attr_name = attr_name
        attr_name = "#{attr_name}_file_size".to_sym
        value = record.send(:read_attribute_for_validation, attr_name)

This cop checks that the ABC size of methods is not higher than the configured maximum. The ABC size is based on assignments, branches (method calls), and conditions. See http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AbcMetric

Method validate_each has a Cognitive Complexity of 14 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

      def validate_each(record, attr_name, value)
        base_attr_name = attr_name
        attr_name = "#{attr_name}_file_size".to_sym
        value = record.send(:read_attribute_for_validation, attr_name)

Severity: Minor
Found in lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb - About 1 hr to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

Similar blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

      def min_value_in_human_size(record)
        value = options[:greater_than_or_equal_to] || options[:greater_than]
        value = value.call(record) if value.respond_to?(:call)
        value = value.min if value.respond_to?(:min)
        human_size(value)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb and 1 other location - About 20 mins to fix
lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb on lines 84..88

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 27.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Similar blocks of code found in 2 locations. Consider refactoring.
Open

      def max_value_in_human_size(record)
        value = options[:less_than_or_equal_to] || options[:less_than]
        value = value.call(record) if value.respond_to?(:call)
        value = value.max if value.respond_to?(:max)
        human_size(value)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb and 1 other location - About 20 mins to fix
lib/paperclip/validators/attachment_size_validator.rb on lines 77..81

Duplicated Code

Duplicated code can lead to software that is hard to understand and difficult to change. The Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle states:

Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.

When you violate DRY, bugs and maintenance problems are sure to follow. Duplicated code has a tendency to both continue to replicate and also to diverge (leaving bugs as two similar implementations differ in subtle ways).

Tuning

This issue has a mass of 27.

We set useful threshold defaults for the languages we support but you may want to adjust these settings based on your project guidelines.

The threshold configuration represents the minimum mass a code block must have to be analyzed for duplication. The lower the threshold, the more fine-grained the comparison.

If the engine is too easily reporting duplication, try raising the threshold. If you suspect that the engine isn't catching enough duplication, try lowering the threshold. The best setting tends to differ from language to language.

See codeclimate-duplication's documentation for more information about tuning the mass threshold in your .codeclimate.yml.

Refactorings

Further Reading

Use Hash#key? instead of Hash#has_key?.
Open

        unless (AVAILABLE_CHECKS + [:in]).any? { |argument| options.has_key?(argument) }

This cop (by default) checks for uses of methods Hash#haskey? and Hash#hasvalue? where it enforces Hash#key? and Hash#value? It is configurable to enforce the inverse, using verbose method names also.

Example: EnforcedStyle: short (default)

# bad Hash#haskey? Hash#hasvalue?

# good Hash#key? Hash#value?

Example: EnforcedStyle: verbose

# bad Hash#key? Hash#value?

# good Hash#haskey? Hash#hasvalue?

Line is too long. [104/80]
Open

          raise ArgumentError, "You must pass either :less_than, :greater_than, or :in to the validator"

Freeze mutable objects assigned to constants.
Open

      AVAILABLE_CHECKS = [:less_than, :less_than_or_equal_to, :greater_than, :greater_than_or_equal_to]

This cop checks whether some constant value isn't a mutable literal (e.g. array or hash).

Example:

# bad
CONST = [1, 2, 3]

# good
CONST = [1, 2, 3].freeze

Do not use space inside array brackets.
Open

              [ attr_name, base_attr_name ].each do |error_attr_name|

Checks that brackets used for array literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that array literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
array = [a, b, c, d]

# good
array = [ a, b, c, d ]

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that array literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
array = [ a, b, c, d ]

# good
array = [a, b, c, d]

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# array brackets, with the exception that successive left
# or right brackets are collapsed together in nested arrays.

# bad
array = [ a, [ b, c ] ]

# good
array = [ a, [ b, c ]]

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

                  :count => human_size(option_value)

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Line is too long. [103/80]
Open

      AVAILABLE_CHECKS = [:less_than, :less_than_or_equal_to, :greater_than, :greater_than_or_equal_to]

Line is too long. [88/80]
Open

        unless (AVAILABLE_CHECKS + [:in]).any? { |argument| options.has_key?(argument) }

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

                  :max => max_value_in_human_size(record),

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Indent the first parameter one step more than filtered_options(value).merge(.
Open

                  :min => min_value_in_human_size(record),
                  :max => max_value_in_human_size(record),
                  :count => human_size(option_value)

This cop checks the indentation of the first parameter in a method call. Parameters after the first one are checked by Style/AlignParameters, not by this cop.

Example:

# bad
some_method(
first_param,
second_param)

# good
some_method(
  first_param,
second_param)

Do not use space inside array brackets.
Open

              [ attr_name, base_attr_name ].each do |error_attr_name|

Checks that brackets used for array literals have or don't have surrounding space depending on configuration.

Example: EnforcedStyle: space

# The `space` style enforces that array literals have
# surrounding space.

# bad
array = [a, b, c, d]

# good
array = [ a, b, c, d ]

Example: EnforcedStyle: no_space

# The `no_space` style enforces that array literals have
# no surrounding space.

# bad
array = [ a, b, c, d ]

# good
array = [a, b, c, d]

Example: EnforcedStyle: compact

# The `compact` style normally requires a space inside
# array brackets, with the exception that successive left
# or right brackets are collapsed together in nested arrays.

# bad
array = [ a, [ b, c ] ]

# good
array = [ a, [ b, c ]]

Argument value was shadowed by a local variable before it was used.
Open

        value = record.send(:read_attribute_for_validation, attr_name)

This cop checks for shadowed arguments.

Example:

# bad

do_something do |foo|
  foo = 42
  puts foo
end

def do_something(foo)
  foo = 42
  puts foo
end

Example:

# good

do_something do |foo|
  foo = foo + 42
  puts foo
end

def do_something(foo)
  foo = foo + 42
  puts foo
end

def do_something(foo)
  puts foo
end

Use the new Ruby 1.9 hash syntax.
Open

                  :min => min_value_in_human_size(record),

This cop checks hash literal syntax.

It can enforce either the use of the class hash rocket syntax or the use of the newer Ruby 1.9 syntax (when applicable).

A separate offense is registered for each problematic pair.

The supported styles are:

  • ruby19 - forces use of the 1.9 syntax (e.g. {a: 1}) when hashes have all symbols for keys
  • hash_rockets - forces use of hash rockets for all hashes
  • nomixedkeys - simply checks for hashes with mixed syntaxes
  • ruby19nomixed_keys - forces use of ruby 1.9 syntax and forbids mixed syntax hashes

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19 (default)

# bad
{:a => 2}
{b: 1, :c => 2}

# good
{a: 2, b: 1}
{:c => 2, 'd' => 2} # acceptable since 'd' isn't a symbol
{d: 1, 'e' => 2} # technically not forbidden

Example: EnforcedStyle: hash_rockets

# bad
{a: 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 5}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: nomixedkeys

# bad
{:a => 1, b: 2}
{c: 1, 'd' => 2}

# good
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 1, d: 2}

Example: EnforcedStyle: ruby19nomixed_keys

# bad
{:a => 1, :b => 2}
{c: 2, 'd' => 3} # should just use hash rockets

# good
{a: 1, b: 2}
{:c => 3, 'd' => 4}

Line is too long. [100/80]
Open

                record.errors.add(error_attr_name, error_message_key, filtered_options(value).merge(

Line is too long. [81/80]
Open

      # * +unless+: Same as +if+ but validates if lambda or method returns false.

Line is too long. [83/80]
Open

    class AttachmentSizeValidator < ActiveModel::Validations::NumericalityValidator

Prefer double-quoted strings unless you need single quotes to avoid extra backslashes for escaping.
Open

require 'active_model/validations/numericality'

Checks if uses of quotes match the configured preference.

Example: EnforcedStyle: single_quotes (default)

# bad
"No special symbols"
"No string interpolation"
"Just text"

# good
'No special symbols'
'No string interpolation'
'Just text'
"Wait! What's #{this}!"

Example: EnforcedStyle: double_quotes

# bad
'Just some text'
'No special chars or interpolation'

# good
"Just some text"
"No special chars or interpolation"
"Every string in #{project} uses double_quotes"

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