GarthDB/postcss-deduplicate

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Expected parentheses around arrow function argument having a body with curly braces.
Open

    this.root.walkRules(rule => {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/deduplicate.js by eslint

Require parens in arrow function arguments (arrow-parens)

Arrow functions can omit parentheses when they have exactly one parameter. In all other cases the parameter(s) must be wrapped in parentheses. This rule enforces the consistent use of parentheses in arrow functions.

Rule Details

This rule enforces parentheses around arrow function parameters regardless of arity. For example:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
a => {}

// Good
(a) => {}

Following this style will help you find arrow functions (=>) which may be mistakenly included in a condition when a comparison such as >= was the intent.

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
if (a => 2) {
}

// Good
if (a >= 2) {
}

The rule can also be configured to discourage the use of parens when they are not required:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
(a) => {}

// Good
a => {}

Options

This rule has a string option and an object one.

String options are:

  • "always" (default) requires parens around arguments in all cases.
  • "as-needed" allows omitting parens when there is only one argument.

Object properties for variants of the "as-needed" option:

  • "requireForBlockBody": true modifies the as-needed rule in order to require parens if the function body is in an instructions block (surrounded by braces).

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => a);
a(foo => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'}
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });

If Statements

One of benefits of this option is that it prevents the incorrect use of arrow functions in conditionals:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
// ...
if (a => b) {
 console.log('bigger');
} else {
 console.log('smaller');
}
// outputs 'bigger', not smaller as expected

The contents of the if statement is an arrow function, not a comparison.

If the arrow function is intentional, it should be wrapped in parens to remove ambiguity.

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 0;
// ...
if ((a) => b) {
 console.log('truthy value returned');
} else {
 console.log('falsey value returned');
}
// outputs 'truthy value returned'

The following is another example of this behavior:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = a => b ? c: d;
// f = ?

f is an arrow function which takes a as an argument and returns the result of b ? c: d.

This should be rewritten like so:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = (a) => b ? c: d;

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'};
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => a);
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

requireForBlockBody

Examples of incorrect code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => a;
a => {};
a => {'\n'};
a.map((x) => x * x);
a.map(x => {
  return x * x;
});
a.then(foo => {});

Examples of correct code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => {'\n'};
a => ({});
() => {};
a => a;
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

Further Reading

Expected parentheses around arrow function argument having a body with curly braces.
Open

      deduplicated.forEach(dedupeRule => {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/deduplicate.js by eslint

Require parens in arrow function arguments (arrow-parens)

Arrow functions can omit parentheses when they have exactly one parameter. In all other cases the parameter(s) must be wrapped in parentheses. This rule enforces the consistent use of parentheses in arrow functions.

Rule Details

This rule enforces parentheses around arrow function parameters regardless of arity. For example:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
a => {}

// Good
(a) => {}

Following this style will help you find arrow functions (=>) which may be mistakenly included in a condition when a comparison such as >= was the intent.

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
if (a => 2) {
}

// Good
if (a >= 2) {
}

The rule can also be configured to discourage the use of parens when they are not required:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
(a) => {}

// Good
a => {}

Options

This rule has a string option and an object one.

String options are:

  • "always" (default) requires parens around arguments in all cases.
  • "as-needed" allows omitting parens when there is only one argument.

Object properties for variants of the "as-needed" option:

  • "requireForBlockBody": true modifies the as-needed rule in order to require parens if the function body is in an instructions block (surrounded by braces).

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => a);
a(foo => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'}
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });

If Statements

One of benefits of this option is that it prevents the incorrect use of arrow functions in conditionals:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
// ...
if (a => b) {
 console.log('bigger');
} else {
 console.log('smaller');
}
// outputs 'bigger', not smaller as expected

The contents of the if statement is an arrow function, not a comparison.

If the arrow function is intentional, it should be wrapped in parens to remove ambiguity.

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 0;
// ...
if ((a) => b) {
 console.log('truthy value returned');
} else {
 console.log('falsey value returned');
}
// outputs 'truthy value returned'

The following is another example of this behavior:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = a => b ? c: d;
// f = ?

f is an arrow function which takes a as an argument and returns the result of b ? c: d.

This should be rewritten like so:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = (a) => b ? c: d;

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'};
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => a);
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

requireForBlockBody

Examples of incorrect code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => a;
a => {};
a => {'\n'};
a.map((x) => x * x);
a.map(x => {
  return x * x;
});
a.then(foo => {});

Examples of correct code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => {'\n'};
a => ({});
() => {};
a => a;
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

Further Reading

Unexpected parentheses around single function argument having a body with no curly braces
Open

    (css) =>
Severity: Minor
Found in src/index.js by eslint

Require parens in arrow function arguments (arrow-parens)

Arrow functions can omit parentheses when they have exactly one parameter. In all other cases the parameter(s) must be wrapped in parentheses. This rule enforces the consistent use of parentheses in arrow functions.

Rule Details

This rule enforces parentheses around arrow function parameters regardless of arity. For example:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
a => {}

// Good
(a) => {}

Following this style will help you find arrow functions (=>) which may be mistakenly included in a condition when a comparison such as >= was the intent.

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
if (a => 2) {
}

// Good
if (a >= 2) {
}

The rule can also be configured to discourage the use of parens when they are not required:

/*eslint-env es6*/

// Bad
(a) => {}

// Good
a => {}

Options

This rule has a string option and an object one.

String options are:

  • "always" (default) requires parens around arguments in all cases.
  • "as-needed" allows omitting parens when there is only one argument.

Object properties for variants of the "as-needed" option:

  • "requireForBlockBody": true modifies the as-needed rule in order to require parens if the function body is in an instructions block (surrounded by braces).

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => a);
a(foo => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "always" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'}
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });

If Statements

One of benefits of this option is that it prevents the incorrect use of arrow functions in conditionals:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
// ...
if (a => b) {
 console.log('bigger');
} else {
 console.log('smaller');
}
// outputs 'bigger', not smaller as expected

The contents of the if statement is an arrow function, not a comparison.

If the arrow function is intentional, it should be wrapped in parens to remove ambiguity.

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1;
var b = 0;
// ...
if ((a) => b) {
 console.log('truthy value returned');
} else {
 console.log('falsey value returned');
}
// outputs 'truthy value returned'

The following is another example of this behavior:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = a => b ? c: d;
// f = ?

f is an arrow function which takes a as an argument and returns the result of b ? c: d.

This should be rewritten like so:

/*eslint-env es6*/

var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
var f = (a) => b ? c: d;

as-needed

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => a;
(a) => {'\n'};
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => a);
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

() => {};
a => {};
a => a;
a => {'\n'};
a.then(foo => {});
a.then(foo => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

requireForBlockBody

Examples of incorrect code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => a;
a => {};
a => {'\n'};
a.map((x) => x * x);
a.map(x => {
  return x * x;
});
a.then(foo => {});

Examples of correct code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

/*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

(a) => {};
(a) => {'\n'};
a => ({});
() => {};
a => a;
a.then((foo) => {});
a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });
a((foo) => { if (true) {} });
(a, b, c) => a;
(a = 10) => a;
([a, b]) => a;
({a, b}) => a;

Further Reading

Unnecessary return statement.
Open

          return;
Severity: Minor
Found in src/deduplicate.js by eslint

Disallow redundant return statements (no-useless-return)

A return; statement with nothing after it is redundant, and has no effect on the runtime behavior of a function. This can be confusing, so it's better to disallow these redundant statements.

Rule Details

This rule aims to report redundant return statements.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/* eslint no-useless-return: "error" */

function foo() { return; }

function foo() {
  doSomething();
  return;
}

function foo() {
  if (condition) {
    bar();
    return;
  } else {
    baz();
  }
}

function foo() {
  switch (bar) {
    case 1:
      doSomething();
    default:
      doSomethingElse();
      return;
  }
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/* eslint no-useless-return: "error" */

function foo() { return 5; }

function foo() {
  return doSomething();
}

function foo() {
  if (condition) {
    bar();
    return;
  } else {
    baz();
  }
  qux();
}

function foo() {
  switch (bar) {
    case 1:
      doSomething();
      return;
    default:
      doSomethingElse();
  }
}

function foo() {
  for (const foo of bar) {
    return;
  }
}

When Not To Use It

If you don't care about disallowing redundant return statements, you can turn off this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Missing trailing comma.
Open

      new Deduplicate(css)
Severity: Minor
Found in src/index.js by eslint

require or disallow trailing commas (comma-dangle)

Trailing commas in object literals are valid according to the ECMAScript 5 (and ECMAScript 3!) spec. However, IE8 (when not in IE8 document mode) and below will throw an error when it encounters trailing commas in JavaScript.

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

Trailing commas simplify adding and removing items to objects and arrays, since only the lines you are modifying must be touched. Another argument in favor of trailing commas is that it improves the clarity of diffs when an item is added or removed from an object or array:

Less clear:

var foo = {
-    bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux"
+    bar: "baz"
 };

More clear:

var foo = {
     bar: "baz",
-    qux: "quux",
 };

Rule Details

This rule enforces consistent use of trailing commas in object and array literals.

Options

This rule has a string option or an object option:

{
    "comma-dangle": ["error", "never"],
    // or
    "comma-dangle": ["error", {
        "arrays": "never",
        "objects": "never",
        "imports": "never",
        "exports": "never",
        "functions": "ignore",
    }]
}
  • "never" (default) disallows trailing commas
  • "always" requires trailing commas
  • "always-multiline" requires trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }
  • "only-multiline" allows (but does not require) trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }

Trailing commas in function declarations and function calls are valid syntax since ECMAScript 2017; however, the string option does not check these situations for backwards compatibility.

You can also use an object option to configure this rule for each type of syntax. Each of the following options can be set to "never", "always", "always-multiline", "only-multiline", or "ignore". The default for each option is "never" unless otherwise specified.

  • arrays is for array literals and array patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let [a,] = [1,];)
  • objects is for object literals and object patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let {a,} = {a: 1};)
  • imports is for import declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. import {a,} from "foo";)
  • exports is for export declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. export {a,};)
  • functions is for function declarations and function calls. (e.g. (function(a,){ })(b,);)
    functions is set to "ignore" by default for consistency with the string option.

never

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "never" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

always

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var arr = [1,2];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var arr = [1,2,];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

always-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

only-multiline

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };

var arr = [1,2,];

var arr = [1,
    2,];

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux",
};

var foo = {
    bar: "baz",
    qux: "quux"
};

var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
var arr = [1,2];

var arr = [1,
    2];

var arr = [
    1,
    2,
];

var arr = [
    1,
    2
];

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux",
});

foo({
  bar: "baz",
  qux: "quux"
});

functions

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b) {
}

foo(a, b);
new foo(a, b);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

/*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/

function foo(a, b,) {
}

foo(a, b,);
new foo(a, b,);

When Not To Use It

You can turn this rule off if you are not concerned with dangling commas. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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