andypike/rectify

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lib/rectify/command.rb

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Rectify::EventRecorder#method_missing refers to 'args' more than self (maybe move it to another class?)
Wontfix

      args = args.first if args.size == 1
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Feature Envy occurs when a code fragment references another object more often than it references itself, or when several clients do the same series of manipulations on a particular type of object.

Feature Envy reduces the code's ability to communicate intent: code that "belongs" on one class but which is located in another can be hard to find, and may upset the "System of Names" in the host class.

Feature Envy also affects the design's flexibility: A code fragment that is in the wrong class creates couplings that may not be natural within the application's domain, and creates a loss of cohesion in the unwilling host class.

Feature Envy often arises because it must manipulate other objects (usually its arguments) to get them into a useful form, and one force preventing them (the arguments) doing this themselves is that the common knowledge lives outside the arguments, or the arguments are of too basic a type to justify extending that type. Therefore there must be something which 'knows' about the contents or purposes of the arguments. That thing would have to be more than just a basic type, because the basic types are either containers which don't know about their contents, or they are single objects which can't capture their relationship with their fellows of the same type. So, this thing with the extra knowledge should be reified into a class, and the utility method will most likely belong there.

Example

Running Reek on:

class Warehouse
  def sale_price(item)
    (item.price - item.rebate) * @vat
  end
end

would report:

Warehouse#total_price refers to item more than self (FeatureEnvy)

since this:

(item.price - item.rebate)

belongs to the Item class, not the Warehouse.

Rectify::EventRecorder#respond_to_missing? has boolean parameter '_include_private'
Wontfix

    def respond_to_missing?(_method_name, _include_private = false)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Boolean Parameter is a special case of Control Couple, where a method parameter is defaulted to true or false. A Boolean Parameter effectively permits a method's caller to decide which execution path to take. This is a case of bad cohesion. You're creating a dependency between methods that is not really necessary, thus increasing coupling.

Example

Given

class Dummy
  def hit_the_switch(switch = true)
    if switch
      puts 'Hitting the switch'
      # do other things...
    else
      puts 'Not hitting the switch'
      # do other things...
    end
  end
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 3 warnings:
  [1]:Dummy#hit_the_switch has boolean parameter 'switch' (BooleanParameter)
  [2]:Dummy#hit_the_switch is controlled by argument switch (ControlParameter)

Note that both smells are reported, Boolean Parameter and Control Parameter.

Getting rid of the smell

This is highly dependent on your exact architecture, but looking at the example above what you could do is:

  • Move everything in the if branch into a separate method
  • Move everything in the else branch into a separate method
  • Get rid of the hit_the_switch method alltogether
  • Make the decision what method to call in the initial caller of hit_the_switch

Rectify::Command#respond_to_missing? has boolean parameter 'include_private'
Open

    def respond_to_missing?(method_name, include_private = false)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Boolean Parameter is a special case of Control Couple, where a method parameter is defaulted to true or false. A Boolean Parameter effectively permits a method's caller to decide which execution path to take. This is a case of bad cohesion. You're creating a dependency between methods that is not really necessary, thus increasing coupling.

Example

Given

class Dummy
  def hit_the_switch(switch = true)
    if switch
      puts 'Hitting the switch'
      # do other things...
    else
      puts 'Not hitting the switch'
      # do other things...
    end
  end
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 3 warnings:
  [1]:Dummy#hit_the_switch has boolean parameter 'switch' (BooleanParameter)
  [2]:Dummy#hit_the_switch is controlled by argument switch (ControlParameter)

Note that both smells are reported, Boolean Parameter and Control Parameter.

Getting rid of the smell

This is highly dependent on your exact architecture, but looking at the example above what you could do is:

  • Move everything in the if branch into a separate method
  • Move everything in the else branch into a separate method
  • Get rid of the hit_the_switch method alltogether
  • Make the decision what method to call in the initial caller of hit_the_switch

Rectify::Command#self.call has approx 6 statements
Wontfix

    def self.call(*args, &block)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

A method with Too Many Statements is any method that has a large number of lines.

Too Many Statements warns about any method that has more than 5 statements. Reek's smell detector for Too Many Statements counts +1 for every simple statement in a method and +1 for every statement within a control structure (if, else, case, when, for, while, until, begin, rescue) but it doesn't count the control structure itself.

So the following method would score +6 in Reek's statement-counting algorithm:

def parse(arg, argv, &error)
  if !(val = arg) and (argv.empty? or /\A-/ =~ (val = argv[0]))
    return nil, block, nil                                         # +1
  end
  opt = (val = parse_arg(val, &error))[1]                          # +2
  val = conv_arg(*val)                                             # +3
  if opt and !arg
    argv.shift                                                     # +4
  else
    val[0] = nil                                                   # +5
  end
  val                                                              # +6
end

(You might argue that the two assigments within the first @if@ should count as statements, and that perhaps the nested assignment should count as +2.)

Rectify::Command assumes too much for instance variable '@caller'
Open

  class Command
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Classes should not assume that instance variables are set or present outside of the current class definition.

Good:

class Foo
  def initialize
    @bar = :foo
  end

  def foo?
    @bar == :foo
  end
end

Good as well:

class Foo
  def foo?
    bar == :foo
  end

  def bar
    @bar ||= :foo
  end
end

Bad:

class Foo
  def go_foo!
    @bar = :foo
  end

  def foo?
    @bar == :foo
  end
end

Example

Running Reek on:

class Dummy
  def test
    @ivar
  end
end

would report:

[1]:InstanceVariableAssumption: Dummy assumes too much for instance variable @ivar

Note that this example would trigger this smell warning as well:

class Parent
  def initialize(omg)
    @omg = omg
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  def foo
    @omg
  end
end

The way to address the smell warning is that you should create an attr_reader to use @omg in the subclass and not access @omg directly like this:

class Parent
  attr_reader :omg

  def initialize(omg)
    @omg = omg
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  def foo
    omg
  end
end

Directly accessing instance variables is considered a smell because it breaks encapsulation and makes it harder to reason about code.

If you don't want to expose those methods as public API just make them private like this:

class Parent
  def initialize(omg)
    @omg = omg
  end

  private
  attr_reader :omg
end

class Child < Parent
  def foo
    omg
  end
end

Current Support in Reek

An instance variable must:

  • be set in the constructor
  • or be accessed through a method with lazy initialization / memoization.

If not, Instance Variable Assumption will be reported.

Rectify::EventRecorder has no descriptive comment
Wontfix

  class EventRecorder
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Classes and modules are the units of reuse and release. It is therefore considered good practice to annotate every class and module with a brief comment outlining its responsibilities.

Example

Given

class Dummy
  # Do things...
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 1 warning:
  [1]:Dummy has no descriptive comment (IrresponsibleModule)

Fixing this is simple - just an explaining comment:

# The Dummy class is responsible for ...
class Dummy
  # Do things...
end

Rectify::Command#respond_to_missing? manually dispatches method call
Open

      @caller.respond_to?(method_name, include_private)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Reek reports a Manual Dispatch smell if it finds source code that manually checks whether an object responds to a method before that method is called. Manual dispatch is a type of Simulated Polymorphism which leads to code that is harder to reason about, debug, and refactor.

Example

class MyManualDispatcher
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
    @foo = foo
  end

  def call
    foo.bar if foo.respond_to?(:bar)
  end
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 1 warning:
  [9]: MyManualDispatcher manually dispatches method call (ManualDispatch)

Rectify::Command has no descriptive comment
Open

  class Command
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Classes and modules are the units of reuse and release. It is therefore considered good practice to annotate every class and module with a brief comment outlining its responsibilities.

Example

Given

class Dummy
  # Do things...
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 1 warning:
  [1]:Dummy has no descriptive comment (IrresponsibleModule)

Fixing this is simple - just an explaining comment:

# The Dummy class is responsible for ...
class Dummy
  # Do things...
end

Rectify::Command#method_missing manually dispatches method call
Open

      if @caller.respond_to?(method_name, true)
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/rectify/command.rb by reek

Reek reports a Manual Dispatch smell if it finds source code that manually checks whether an object responds to a method before that method is called. Manual dispatch is a type of Simulated Polymorphism which leads to code that is harder to reason about, debug, and refactor.

Example

class MyManualDispatcher
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
    @foo = foo
  end

  def call
    foo.bar if foo.respond_to?(:bar)
  end
end

Reek would emit the following warning:

test.rb -- 1 warning:
  [9]: MyManualDispatcher manually dispatches method call (ManualDispatch)

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