asteris-llc/converge

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check_license.sh
A

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

SRC_DIRS=$(find $(realpath .) -type d -maxdepth 1 -not -ipath '*/vendor' -not -ipath '*/.git' -not -ipath $(realpath .))
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Quote this to prevent word splitting.
Open

SRC_DIRS=$(find $(realpath .) -type d -maxdepth 1 -not -ipath '*/vendor' -not -ipath '*/.git' -not -ipath $(realpath .))
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Quote this to prevent word splitting

Problematic code:

ls -l $(getfilename)

Correct code:

# getfilename outputs 1 file
ls -l "$(getfilename)"

# getfilename outputs multiple files, linefeed separated
getfilename | while IFS='' read -r line
do
  ls -l "$line"
done

Rationale:

When command expansions are unquoted, word splitting and globbing will occur. This often manifests itself by breaking when filenames contain spaces.

Trying to fix it by adding quotes or escapes to the data will not work. Instead, quote the command substitution itself.

If the command substitution outputs multiple pieces of data, use a loop instead.

Exceptions

In rare cases you actually want word splitting, such as in

gcc $(pkg-config --libs openssl) client.c

This is because pkg-config outputs -lssl -lcrypto, which you want to break up by spaces into -lssl and -lcrypto.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.
Open

FILES=$(find ${SRC_DIRS} -type f -name '*.go')
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.

Problematic code:

sh echo $1 for i in $*; do :; done # this one and the next one also applies to expanding arrays. for i in $@; do :; done

Correct code:

sh echo "$1" for i in "$@"; do :; done # or, 'for i; do'

Rationale

The first code looks like "print the first argument". It's actually "Split the first argument by IFS (spaces, tabs and line feeds). Expand each of them as if it was a glob. Join all the resulting strings and filenames with spaces. Print the result."

The second one looks like "iterate through all arguments". It's actually "join all the arguments by the first character of IFS (space), split them by IFS and expand each of them as globs, and iterate on the resulting list". The third one skips the joining part.

Quoting variables prevents word splitting and glob expansion, and prevents the script from breaking when input contains spaces, line feeds, glob characters and such.

Strictly speaking, only expansions themselves need to be quoted, but for stylistic reasons, entire arguments with multiple variable and literal parts are often quoted as one:

sh $HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file # Unquoted (bad) "$HOME"/"$dir"/dist/bin/"$file" # Minimal quoting (good) "$HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file" # Canonical quoting (good)

When quoting composite arguments, make sure to exclude globs and brace expansions, which lose their special meaning in double quotes: "$HOME/$dir/src/*.c" will not expand, but "$HOME/$dir/src"/*.c will.

Note that $( ) starts a new context, and variables in it have to be quoted independently:

sh echo "This $variable is quoted $(but this $variable is not)" echo "This $variable is quoted $(and now this "$variable" is too)"

Exceptions

Sometimes you want to split on spaces, like when building a command line.

sh options="-j 5 -B" make $options file

Just quoting this doesn't work. Instead, you should have used an array (bash, ksh, zsh):

bash options=(-j 5 -B) # ksh: set -A options -- -j 5 -B make "${options[@]}" file

or a function (POSIX):

sh make_with_flags() { make -j 5 -B "$@"; } make_with_flags file

To split on spaces but not perform glob expansion, Posix has a set -f to disable globbing. You can disable word splitting by setting IFS=''.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.
Open

    diff <(head -n ${HEADER_LEN} $i) <(echo "${LICENSE_HEADER}") > /dev/null
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.

Problematic code:

sh echo $1 for i in $*; do :; done # this one and the next one also applies to expanding arrays. for i in $@; do :; done

Correct code:

sh echo "$1" for i in "$@"; do :; done # or, 'for i; do'

Rationale

The first code looks like "print the first argument". It's actually "Split the first argument by IFS (spaces, tabs and line feeds). Expand each of them as if it was a glob. Join all the resulting strings and filenames with spaces. Print the result."

The second one looks like "iterate through all arguments". It's actually "join all the arguments by the first character of IFS (space), split them by IFS and expand each of them as globs, and iterate on the resulting list". The third one skips the joining part.

Quoting variables prevents word splitting and glob expansion, and prevents the script from breaking when input contains spaces, line feeds, glob characters and such.

Strictly speaking, only expansions themselves need to be quoted, but for stylistic reasons, entire arguments with multiple variable and literal parts are often quoted as one:

sh $HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file # Unquoted (bad) "$HOME"/"$dir"/dist/bin/"$file" # Minimal quoting (good) "$HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file" # Canonical quoting (good)

When quoting composite arguments, make sure to exclude globs and brace expansions, which lose their special meaning in double quotes: "$HOME/$dir/src/*.c" will not expand, but "$HOME/$dir/src"/*.c will.

Note that $( ) starts a new context, and variables in it have to be quoted independently:

sh echo "This $variable is quoted $(but this $variable is not)" echo "This $variable is quoted $(and now this "$variable" is too)"

Exceptions

Sometimes you want to split on spaces, like when building a command line.

sh options="-j 5 -B" make $options file

Just quoting this doesn't work. Instead, you should have used an array (bash, ksh, zsh):

bash options=(-j 5 -B) # ksh: set -A options -- -j 5 -B make "${options[@]}" file

or a function (POSIX):

sh make_with_flags() { make -j 5 -B "$@"; } make_with_flags file

To split on spaces but not perform glob expansion, Posix has a set -f to disable globbing. You can disable word splitting by setting IFS=''.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.
Open

    diff <(head -n ${HEADER_LEN} $i) <(echo "${LICENSE_HEADER}") > /dev/null
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.

Problematic code:

sh echo $1 for i in $*; do :; done # this one and the next one also applies to expanding arrays. for i in $@; do :; done

Correct code:

sh echo "$1" for i in "$@"; do :; done # or, 'for i; do'

Rationale

The first code looks like "print the first argument". It's actually "Split the first argument by IFS (spaces, tabs and line feeds). Expand each of them as if it was a glob. Join all the resulting strings and filenames with spaces. Print the result."

The second one looks like "iterate through all arguments". It's actually "join all the arguments by the first character of IFS (space), split them by IFS and expand each of them as globs, and iterate on the resulting list". The third one skips the joining part.

Quoting variables prevents word splitting and glob expansion, and prevents the script from breaking when input contains spaces, line feeds, glob characters and such.

Strictly speaking, only expansions themselves need to be quoted, but for stylistic reasons, entire arguments with multiple variable and literal parts are often quoted as one:

sh $HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file # Unquoted (bad) "$HOME"/"$dir"/dist/bin/"$file" # Minimal quoting (good) "$HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file" # Canonical quoting (good)

When quoting composite arguments, make sure to exclude globs and brace expansions, which lose their special meaning in double quotes: "$HOME/$dir/src/*.c" will not expand, but "$HOME/$dir/src"/*.c will.

Note that $( ) starts a new context, and variables in it have to be quoted independently:

sh echo "This $variable is quoted $(but this $variable is not)" echo "This $variable is quoted $(and now this "$variable" is too)"

Exceptions

Sometimes you want to split on spaces, like when building a command line.

sh options="-j 5 -B" make $options file

Just quoting this doesn't work. Instead, you should have used an array (bash, ksh, zsh):

bash options=(-j 5 -B) # ksh: set -A options -- -j 5 -B make "${options[@]}" file

or a function (POSIX):

sh make_with_flags() { make -j 5 -B "$@"; } make_with_flags file

To split on spaces but not perform glob expansion, Posix has a set -f to disable globbing. You can disable word splitting by setting IFS=''.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.
Open

        echo $i
Severity: Minor
Found in check_license.sh by shellcheck

Double quote to prevent globbing and word splitting.

Problematic code:

sh echo $1 for i in $*; do :; done # this one and the next one also applies to expanding arrays. for i in $@; do :; done

Correct code:

sh echo "$1" for i in "$@"; do :; done # or, 'for i; do'

Rationale

The first code looks like "print the first argument". It's actually "Split the first argument by IFS (spaces, tabs and line feeds). Expand each of them as if it was a glob. Join all the resulting strings and filenames with spaces. Print the result."

The second one looks like "iterate through all arguments". It's actually "join all the arguments by the first character of IFS (space), split them by IFS and expand each of them as globs, and iterate on the resulting list". The third one skips the joining part.

Quoting variables prevents word splitting and glob expansion, and prevents the script from breaking when input contains spaces, line feeds, glob characters and such.

Strictly speaking, only expansions themselves need to be quoted, but for stylistic reasons, entire arguments with multiple variable and literal parts are often quoted as one:

sh $HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file # Unquoted (bad) "$HOME"/"$dir"/dist/bin/"$file" # Minimal quoting (good) "$HOME/$dir/dist/bin/$file" # Canonical quoting (good)

When quoting composite arguments, make sure to exclude globs and brace expansions, which lose their special meaning in double quotes: "$HOME/$dir/src/*.c" will not expand, but "$HOME/$dir/src"/*.c will.

Note that $( ) starts a new context, and variables in it have to be quoted independently:

sh echo "This $variable is quoted $(but this $variable is not)" echo "This $variable is quoted $(and now this "$variable" is too)"

Exceptions

Sometimes you want to split on spaces, like when building a command line.

sh options="-j 5 -B" make $options file

Just quoting this doesn't work. Instead, you should have used an array (bash, ksh, zsh):

bash options=(-j 5 -B) # ksh: set -A options -- -j 5 -B make "${options[@]}" file

or a function (POSIX):

sh make_with_flags() { make -j 5 -B "$@"; } make_with_flags file

To split on spaces but not perform glob expansion, Posix has a set -f to disable globbing. You can disable word splitting by setting IFS=''.

Notice

Original content from the ShellCheck https://github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki.

There are no issues that match your filters.

Category
Status
#!/bin/bash

# Copyright © 2016 Asteris, LLC
#
# Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
# you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
# You may obtain a copy of the License at
#
#     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
#
# Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
# distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
# WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
# See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
# limitations under the License.

SRC_DIRS=$(find $(realpath .) -type d -maxdepth 1 -not -ipath '*/vendor' -not -ipath '*/.git' -not -ipath $(realpath .))
FILES=$(find ${SRC_DIRS} -type f -name '*.go')

LICENSE_HEADER=$(cat <<EOF
// Copyright © 2016 Asteris, LLC
//
// Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
// you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
// You may obtain a copy of the License at
//
//     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
//
// Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
// distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
// WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
// See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
// limitations under the License.
EOF
)

HEADER_LEN=$(echo "${LICENSE_HEADER}" | wc -l)

for i in ${FILES}; do
    diff <(head -n ${HEADER_LEN} $i) <(echo "${LICENSE_HEADER}") > /dev/null
    if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]; then
        echo $i
    fi
done

Size

Lines of code
44