glitch-soc/mastodon

View on GitHub

Showing 1,916 of 1,916 total issues

CSRF vulnerability in OmniAuth's request phase
Open

    omniauth (1.9.1)
Severity: Critical
Found in Gemfile.lock by bundler-audit

Advisory: CVE-2015-9284

Criticality: High

URL: https://github.com/omniauth/omniauth/wiki/Resolving-CVE-2015-9284

Solution: upgrade to >= 2.0.0

Block has too many lines. [436/55]
Open

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  root 'home#index'

  mount LetterOpenerWeb::Engine, at: 'letter_opener' if Rails.env.development?

Severity: Minor
Found in config/routes.rb by rubocop

This cop checks if the length of a block exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable. The cop can be configured to ignore blocks passed to certain methods.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

NOTE: The ExcludedMethods configuration is deprecated and only kept for backwards compatibility. Please use IgnoredMethods instead.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

something do
  array = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  hash = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  msg = <

NOTE: This cop does not apply for Struct definitions.

Block has too many lines. [171/55]
Open

  namespace :api do
    # OEmbed
    get '/oembed', to: 'oembed#show', as: :oembed

    # JSON / REST API
Severity: Minor
Found in config/routes.rb by rubocop

This cop checks if the length of a block exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable. The cop can be configured to ignore blocks passed to certain methods.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

NOTE: The ExcludedMethods configuration is deprecated and only kept for backwards compatibility. Please use IgnoredMethods instead.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

something do
  array = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  hash = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  msg = <

NOTE: This cop does not apply for Struct definitions.

Module has too many lines. [218/200]
Open

module AccountInteractions
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  class_methods do
    def following_map(target_account_ids, account_id)

This cop checks if the length a module exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

module M
  ARRAY = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  HASH = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  MSG = <

Block has too many lines. [154/55]
Open

    namespace :v1 do
      resources :statuses, only: [:create, :show, :destroy] do
        scope module: :statuses do
          resources :reblogged_by, controller: :reblogged_by_accounts, only: :index
          resources :favourited_by, controller: :favourited_by_accounts, only: :index
Severity: Minor
Found in config/routes.rb by rubocop

This cop checks if the length of a block exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable. The cop can be configured to ignore blocks passed to certain methods.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

NOTE: The ExcludedMethods configuration is deprecated and only kept for backwards compatibility. Please use IgnoredMethods instead.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

something do
  array = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  hash = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  msg = <

NOTE: This cop does not apply for Struct definitions.

Block has too many lines. [116/55]
Open

  namespace :admin do
    get '/dashboard', to: 'dashboard#index'

    resources :domain_allows, only: [:new, :create, :show, :destroy]
    resources :domain_blocks, only: [:new, :create, :show, :destroy, :update, :edit]
Severity: Minor
Found in config/routes.rb by rubocop

This cop checks if the length of a block exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable. The cop can be configured to ignore blocks passed to certain methods.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

NOTE: The ExcludedMethods configuration is deprecated and only kept for backwards compatibility. Please use IgnoredMethods instead.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

something do
  array = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  hash = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  msg = <

NOTE: This cop does not apply for Struct definitions.

Perceived complexity for process_update is too high. [30/25]
Open

  def process_update
    user.settings['notification_emails'] = merged_notification_emails if change?('notification_emails')
    user.settings['interactions']        = merged_interactions if change?('interactions')
    user.settings['default_privacy']     = default_privacy_preference if change?('setting_default_privacy')
    user.settings['default_sensitive']   = default_sensitive_preference if change?('setting_default_sensitive')
Severity: Minor
Found in app/lib/user_settings_decorator.rb by rubocop

This cop tries to produce a complexity score that's a measure of the complexity the reader experiences when looking at a method. For that reason it considers when nodes as something that doesn't add as much complexity as an if or a &&. Except if it's one of those special case/when constructs where there's no expression after case. Then the cop treats it as an if/elsif/elsif... and lets all the when nodes count. In contrast to the CyclomaticComplexity cop, this cop considers else nodes as adding complexity.

Example:

def my_method                   # 1
  if cond                       # 1
    case var                    # 2 (0.8 + 4 * 0.2, rounded)
    when 1 then func_one
    when 2 then func_two
    when 3 then func_three
    when 4..10 then func_other
    end
  else                          # 1
    do_something until a && b   # 2
  end                           # ===
end                             # 7 complexity points

Cyclomatic complexity for process_update is too high. [30/25]
Open

  def process_update
    user.settings['notification_emails'] = merged_notification_emails if change?('notification_emails')
    user.settings['interactions']        = merged_interactions if change?('interactions')
    user.settings['default_privacy']     = default_privacy_preference if change?('setting_default_privacy')
    user.settings['default_sensitive']   = default_sensitive_preference if change?('setting_default_sensitive')
Severity: Minor
Found in app/lib/user_settings_decorator.rb by rubocop

This cop checks that the cyclomatic complexity of methods is not higher than the configured maximum. The cyclomatic complexity is the number of linearly independent paths through a method. The algorithm counts decision points and adds one.

An if statement (or unless or ?:) increases the complexity by one. An else branch does not, since it doesn't add a decision point. The && operator (or keyword and) can be converted to a nested if statement, and ||/or is shorthand for a sequence of ifs, so they also add one. Loops can be said to have an exit condition, so they add one. Blocks that are calls to builtin iteration methods (e.g. `ary.map{...}) also add one, others are ignored.

def each_child_node(*types)               # count begins: 1
  unless block_given?                     # unless: +1
    return to_enum(__method__, *types)

  children.each do |child|                # each{}: +1
    next unless child.is_a?(Node)         # unless: +1

    yield child if types.empty? ||        # if: +1, ||: +1
                   types.include?(child.type)
  end

  self
end                                       # total: 6

Perceived complexity for preprocess_attributes! is too high. [27/25]
Open

  def preprocess_attributes!
    if @text.blank? && @options[:spoiler_text].present?
     @text = '.'
     if @media&.find(&:video?) || @media&.find(&:gifv?)
       @text = '📹'
Severity: Minor
Found in app/services/post_status_service.rb by rubocop

This cop tries to produce a complexity score that's a measure of the complexity the reader experiences when looking at a method. For that reason it considers when nodes as something that doesn't add as much complexity as an if or a &&. Except if it's one of those special case/when constructs where there's no expression after case. Then the cop treats it as an if/elsif/elsif... and lets all the when nodes count. In contrast to the CyclomaticComplexity cop, this cop considers else nodes as adding complexity.

Example:

def my_method                   # 1
  if cond                       # 1
    case var                    # 2 (0.8 + 4 * 0.2, rounded)
    when 1 then func_one
    when 2 then func_two
    when 3 then func_three
    when 4..10 then func_other
    end
  else                          # 1
    do_something until a && b   # 2
  end                           # ===
end                             # 7 complexity points

Cyclomatic complexity for preprocess_attributes! is too high. [26/25]
Open

  def preprocess_attributes!
    if @text.blank? && @options[:spoiler_text].present?
     @text = '.'
     if @media&.find(&:video?) || @media&.find(&:gifv?)
       @text = '📹'
Severity: Minor
Found in app/services/post_status_service.rb by rubocop

This cop checks that the cyclomatic complexity of methods is not higher than the configured maximum. The cyclomatic complexity is the number of linearly independent paths through a method. The algorithm counts decision points and adds one.

An if statement (or unless or ?:) increases the complexity by one. An else branch does not, since it doesn't add a decision point. The && operator (or keyword and) can be converted to a nested if statement, and ||/or is shorthand for a sequence of ifs, so they also add one. Loops can be said to have an exit condition, so they add one. Blocks that are calls to builtin iteration methods (e.g. `ary.map{...}) also add one, others are ignored.

def each_child_node(*types)               # count begins: 1
  unless block_given?                     # unless: +1
    return to_enum(__method__, *types)

  children.each do |child|                # each{}: +1
    next unless child.is_a?(Node)         # unless: +1

    yield child if types.empty? ||        # if: +1, ||: +1
                   types.include?(child.type)
  end

  self
end                                       # total: 6

Perceived complexity for remove_orphans is too high. [26/25]
Open

    def remove_orphans
      progress        = create_progress_bar(nil)
      reclaimed_bytes = 0
      removed         = 0
      dry_run         = options[:dry_run] ? ' (DRY RUN)' : ''
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/mastodon/media_cli.rb by rubocop

This cop tries to produce a complexity score that's a measure of the complexity the reader experiences when looking at a method. For that reason it considers when nodes as something that doesn't add as much complexity as an if or a &&. Except if it's one of those special case/when constructs where there's no expression after case. Then the cop treats it as an if/elsif/elsif... and lets all the when nodes count. In contrast to the CyclomaticComplexity cop, this cop considers else nodes as adding complexity.

Example:

def my_method                   # 1
  if cond                       # 1
    case var                    # 2 (0.8 + 4 * 0.2, rounded)
    when 1 then func_one
    when 2 then func_two
    when 3 then func_three
    when 4..10 then func_other
    end
  else                          # 1
    do_something until a && b   # 2
  end                           # ===
end                             # 7 complexity points

Possible SQL injection
Open

                -- Of the MD5 hash of the data we documented
Severity: Minor
Found in lib/mastodon/snowflake.rb by brakeman

Injection is #1 on the 2013 OWASP Top Ten web security risks. SQL injection is when a user is able to manipulate a value which is used unsafely inside a SQL query. This can lead to data leaks, data loss, elevation of privilege, and other unpleasant outcomes.

Brakeman focuses on ActiveRecord methods dealing with building SQL statements.

A basic (Rails 2.x) example looks like this:

User.first(:conditions => "username = '#{params[:username]}'")

Brakeman would produce a warning like this:

Possible SQL injection near line 30: User.first(:conditions => ("username = '#{params[:username]}'"))

The safe way to do this query is to use a parameterized query:

User.first(:conditions => ["username = ?", params[:username]])

Brakeman also understands the new Rails 3.x way of doing things (and local variables and concatenation):

username = params[:user][:name].downcase
password = params[:user][:password]

User.first.where("username = '" + username + "' AND password = '" + password + "'")

This results in this kind of warning:

Possible SQL injection near line 37:
User.first.where((((("username = '" + params[:user][:name].downcase) + "' AND password = '") + params[:user][:password]) + "'"))

See the Ruby Security Guide for more information and Rails-SQLi.org for many examples of SQL injection in Rails.

Avoid parameter lists longer than 5 parameters. [6/5]
Open

  def request_follow!(other_account, reblogs: nil, notify: nil, uri: nil, rate_limit: false, bypass_limit: false)

This cop checks for methods with too many parameters.

The maximum number of parameters is configurable. Keyword arguments can optionally be excluded from the total count, as they add less complexity than positional or optional parameters.

Example: Max: 3

# good
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: Max: 2

# bad
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: true (default)

# counts keyword args towards the maximum

# bad (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c: 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: false

# don't count keyword args towards the maximum

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

This cop also checks for the maximum number of optional parameters. This can be configured using the MaxOptionalParameters config option.

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 3 (default)

# good
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 2

# bad
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Avoid parameter lists longer than 5 parameters. [6/5]
Open

  def follow!(other_account, reblogs: nil, notify: nil, uri: nil, rate_limit: false, bypass_limit: false)

This cop checks for methods with too many parameters.

The maximum number of parameters is configurable. Keyword arguments can optionally be excluded from the total count, as they add less complexity than positional or optional parameters.

Example: Max: 3

# good
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: Max: 2

# bad
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: true (default)

# counts keyword args towards the maximum

# bad (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c: 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: false

# don't count keyword args towards the maximum

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

This cop also checks for the maximum number of optional parameters. This can be configured using the MaxOptionalParameters config option.

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 3 (default)

# good
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 2

# bad
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Method has too many optional parameters. [4/3]
Open

  def descendants(limit, account = nil, max_child_id = nil, since_child_id = nil, depth = nil)
    find_statuses_from_tree_path(descendant_ids(limit, max_child_id, since_child_id, depth), account, promote: true)
  end

This cop checks for methods with too many parameters.

The maximum number of parameters is configurable. Keyword arguments can optionally be excluded from the total count, as they add less complexity than positional or optional parameters.

Example: Max: 3

# good
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: Max: 2

# bad
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: true (default)

# counts keyword args towards the maximum

# bad (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c: 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: false

# don't count keyword args towards the maximum

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

This cop also checks for the maximum number of optional parameters. This can be configured using the MaxOptionalParameters config option.

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 3 (default)

# good
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 2

# bad
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Method has too many optional parameters. [4/3]
Open

    def as_direct_timeline(account, limit = 20, max_id = nil, since_id = nil, cache_ids = false)
      # direct timeline is mix of direct message from_me and to_me.
      # 2 queries are executed with pagination.
      # constant expression using arel_table is required for partial index

Severity: Minor
Found in app/models/status.rb by rubocop

This cop checks for methods with too many parameters.

The maximum number of parameters is configurable. Keyword arguments can optionally be excluded from the total count, as they add less complexity than positional or optional parameters.

Example: Max: 3

# good
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: Max: 2

# bad
def foo(a, b, c = 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: true (default)

# counts keyword args towards the maximum

# bad (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c: 1)
end

Example: CountKeywordArgs: false

# don't count keyword args towards the maximum

# good (assuming Max is 3)
def foo(a, b, c, d: 1)
end

This cop also checks for the maximum number of optional parameters. This can be configured using the MaxOptionalParameters config option.

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 3 (default)

# good
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Example: MaxOptionalParameters: 2

# bad
def foo(a = 1, b = 2, c = 3)
end

Block has too many lines. [56/55]
Open

SimpleNavigation::Configuration.run do |navigation|
  navigation.items do |n|
    n.item :web, safe_join([fa_icon('chevron-left fw'), t('settings.back')]), root_url

    n.item :profile, safe_join([fa_icon('user fw'), t('settings.profile')]), settings_profile_url, if: -> { current_user.functional? } do |s|
Severity: Minor
Found in config/navigation.rb by rubocop

This cop checks if the length of a block exceeds some maximum value. Comment lines can optionally be ignored. The maximum allowed length is configurable. The cop can be configured to ignore blocks passed to certain methods.

You can set literals you want to fold with CountAsOne. Available are: 'array', 'hash', and 'heredoc'. Each literal will be counted as one line regardless of its actual size.

NOTE: The ExcludedMethods configuration is deprecated and only kept for backwards compatibility. Please use IgnoredMethods instead.

Example: CountAsOne: ['array', 'heredoc']

something do
  array = [         # +1
    1,
    2
  ]

  hash = {          # +3
    key: 'value'
  }

  msg = <

NOTE: This cop does not apply for Struct definitions.

Expected indentation of 8 spaces but found 7.
Open

       displayName.push(` +${others.size - 2}`);

enforce consistent indentation (indent)

There are several common guidelines which require specific indentation of nested blocks and statements, like:

function hello(indentSize, type) {
    if (indentSize === 4 && type !== 'tab') {
        console.log('Each next indentation will increase on 4 spaces');
    }
}

These are the most common scenarios recommended in different style guides:

  • Two spaces, not longer and no tabs: Google, npm, Node.js, Idiomatic, Felix
  • Tabs: jQuery
  • Four spaces: Crockford

Rule Details

This rule enforces a consistent indentation style. The default style is 4 spaces.

Options

This rule has a mixed option:

For example, for 2-space indentation:

{
    "indent": ["error", 2]
}

Or for tabbed indentation:

{
    "indent": ["error", "tab"]
}

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default options:

/*eslint indent: "error"*/

if (a) {
  b=c;
  function foo(d) {
    e=f;
  }
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default options:

/*eslint indent: "error"*/

if (a) {
    b=c;
    function foo(d) {
        e=f;
    }
}

This rule has an object option:

  • "SwitchCase" (default: 0) enforces indentation level for case clauses in switch statements
  • "VariableDeclarator" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for var declarators; can also take an object to define separate rules for var, let and const declarations. It can also be "first", indicating all the declarators should be aligned with the first declarator.
  • "outerIIFEBody" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for file-level IIFEs. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for file-level IIFEs.
  • "MemberExpression" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for multi-line property chains. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for MemberExpression indentation.
  • "FunctionDeclaration" takes an object to define rules for function declarations.
    • parameters (default: 1) enforces indentation level for parameters in a function declaration. This can either be a number indicating indentation level, or the string "first" indicating that all parameters of the declaration must be aligned with the first parameter. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for FunctionDeclaration parameters.
    • body (default: 1) enforces indentation level for the body of a function declaration.
  • "FunctionExpression" takes an object to define rules for function expressions.
    • parameters (default: 1) enforces indentation level for parameters in a function expression. This can either be a number indicating indentation level, or the string "first" indicating that all parameters of the expression must be aligned with the first parameter. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for FunctionExpression parameters.
    • body (default: 1) enforces indentation level for the body of a function expression.
  • "CallExpression" takes an object to define rules for function call expressions.
    • arguments (default: 1) enforces indentation level for arguments in a call expression. This can either be a number indicating indentation level, or the string "first" indicating that all arguments of the expression must be aligned with the first argument. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for CallExpression arguments.
  • "ArrayExpression" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for elements in arrays. It can also be set to the string "first", indicating that all the elements in the array should be aligned with the first element. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for array elements.
  • "ObjectExpression" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for properties in objects. It can be set to the string "first", indicating that all properties in the object should be aligned with the first property. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for object properties.
  • "ImportDeclaration" (default: 1) enforces indentation level for import statements. It can be set to the string "first", indicating that all imported members from a module should be aligned with the first member in the list. This can also be set to "off" to disable checking for imported module members.
  • "flatTernaryExpressions": true (false by default) requires no indentation for ternary expressions which are nested in other ternary expressions.
  • "offsetTernaryExpressions": true (false by default) requires indentation for values of ternary expressions.
  • "ignoredNodes" accepts an array of selectors. If an AST node is matched by any of the selectors, the indentation of tokens which are direct children of that node will be ignored. This can be used as an escape hatch to relax the rule if you disagree with the indentation that it enforces for a particular syntactic pattern.
  • "ignoreComments" (default: false) can be used when comments do not need to be aligned with nodes on the previous or next line.

Level of indentation denotes the multiple of the indent specified. Example:

  • Indent of 4 spaces with VariableDeclarator set to 2 will indent the multi-line variable declarations with 8 spaces.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with VariableDeclarator set to 2 will indent the multi-line variable declarations with 4 spaces.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with VariableDeclarator set to {"var": 2, "let": 2, "const": 3} will indent the multi-line variable declarations with 4 spaces for var and let, 6 spaces for const statements.
  • Indent of tab with VariableDeclarator set to 2 will indent the multi-line variable declarations with 2 tabs.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with SwitchCase set to 0 will not indent case clauses with respect to switch statements.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with SwitchCase set to 1 will indent case clauses with 2 spaces with respect to switch statements.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with SwitchCase set to 2 will indent case clauses with 4 spaces with respect to switch statements.
  • Indent of tab with SwitchCase set to 2 will indent case clauses with 2 tabs with respect to switch statements.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with MemberExpression set to 0 will indent the multi-line property chains with 0 spaces.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with MemberExpression set to 1 will indent the multi-line property chains with 2 spaces.
  • Indent of 2 spaces with MemberExpression set to 2 will indent the multi-line property chains with 4 spaces.
  • Indent of 4 spaces with MemberExpression set to 0 will indent the multi-line property chains with 0 spaces.
  • Indent of 4 spaces with MemberExpression set to 1 will indent the multi-line property chains with 4 spaces.
  • Indent of 4 spaces with MemberExpression set to 2 will indent the multi-line property chains with 8 spaces.

tab

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "tab" option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", "tab"]*/

if (a) {
     b=c;
function foo(d) {
           e=f;
 }
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "tab" option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", "tab"]*/

if (a) {
/*tab*/b=c;
/*tab*/function foo(d) {
/*tab*//*tab*/e=f;
/*tab*/}
}

SwitchCase

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "SwitchCase": 1 } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "SwitchCase": 1 }]*/

switch(a){
case "a":
    break;
case "b":
    break;
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "SwitchCase": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "SwitchCase": 1 }]*/

switch(a){
  case "a":
    break;
  case "b":
    break;
}

VariableDeclarator

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 1 } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 1 }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
    b,
    c;
let a,
    b,
    c;
const a = 1,
    b = 2,
    c = 3;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 1 } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 1 }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
  b,
  c;
let a,
  b,
  c;
const a = 1,
  b = 2,
  c = 3;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 2 } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": 2 }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
    b,
    c;
let a,
    b,
    c;
const a = 1,
    b = 2,
    c = 3;

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": "first" } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": "first" }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
  b,
  c;
let a,
  b,
  c;
const a = 1,
  b = 2,
  c = 3;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": "first" } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": "first" }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
    b,
    c;
let a,
    b,
    c;
const a = 1,
      b = 2,
      c = 3;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "VariableDeclarator": { "var": 2, "let": 2, "const": 3 } } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "VariableDeclarator": { "var": 2, "let": 2, "const": 3 } }]*/
/*eslint-env es6*/

var a,
    b,
    c;
let a,
    b,
    c;
const a = 1,
      b = 2,
      c = 3;

outerIIFEBody

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the options 2, { "outerIIFEBody": 0 }:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "outerIIFEBody": 0 }]*/

(function() {

  function foo(x) {
    return x + 1;
  }

})();


if (y) {
console.log('foo');
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the options 2, { "outerIIFEBody": 0 }:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "outerIIFEBody": 0 }]*/

(function() {

function foo(x) {
  return x + 1;
}

})();


if (y) {
   console.log('foo');
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the options 2, { "outerIIFEBody": "off" }:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "outerIIFEBody": "off" }]*/

(function() {

function foo(x) {
  return x + 1;
}

})();

(function() {

  function foo(x) {
    return x + 1;
  }

})();

if (y) {
  console.log('foo');
}

MemberExpression

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "MemberExpression": 1 } options:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "MemberExpression": 1 }]*/

foo
.bar
.baz()

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "MemberExpression": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "MemberExpression": 1 }]*/

foo
  .bar
  .baz();

FunctionDeclaration

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} }]*/

function foo(bar,
  baz,
  qux) {
    qux();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} }]*/

function foo(bar,
    baz,
    qux) {
  qux();
}

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"parameters": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"FunctionDeclaration": {"parameters": "first"}}]*/

function foo(bar, baz,
  qux, boop) {
  qux();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionDeclaration": {"parameters": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"FunctionDeclaration": {"parameters": "first"}}]*/

function foo(bar, baz,
             qux, boop) {
  qux();
}

FunctionExpression

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} }]*/

var foo = function(bar,
  baz,
  qux) {
    qux();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"body": 1, "parameters": 2} }]*/

var foo = function(bar,
    baz,
    qux) {
  qux();
}

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"parameters": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"FunctionExpression": {"parameters": "first"}}]*/

var foo = function(bar, baz,
  qux, boop) {
  qux();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "FunctionExpression": {"parameters": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"FunctionExpression": {"parameters": "first"}}]*/

var foo = function(bar, baz,
                   qux, boop) {
  qux();
}

CallExpression

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": 1} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": 1} }]*/

foo(bar,
    baz,
      qux
);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": 1} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": 1} }]*/

foo(bar,
  baz,
  qux
);

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"CallExpression": {"arguments": "first"}}]*/

foo(bar, baz,
  baz, boop, beep);

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "CallExpression": {"arguments": "first"} } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"CallExpression": {"arguments": "first"}}]*/

foo(bar, baz,
    baz, boop, beep);

ArrayExpression

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "ArrayExpression": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "ArrayExpression": 1 }]*/

var foo = [
    bar,
baz,
      qux
];

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "ArrayExpression": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "ArrayExpression": 1 }]*/

var foo = [
  bar,
  baz,
  qux
];

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "ArrayExpression": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"ArrayExpression": "first"}]*/

var foo = [bar,
  baz,
  qux
];

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "ArrayExpression": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"ArrayExpression": "first"}]*/

var foo = [bar,
           baz,
           qux
];

ObjectExpression

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "ObjectExpression": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "ObjectExpression": 1 }]*/

var foo = {
    bar: 1,
baz: 2,
      qux: 3
};

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "ObjectExpression": 1 } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "ObjectExpression": 1 }]*/

var foo = {
  bar: 1,
  baz: 2,
  qux: 3
};

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "ObjectExpression": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"ObjectExpression": "first"}]*/

var foo = { bar: 1,
  baz: 2 };

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "ObjectExpression": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, {"ObjectExpression": "first"}]*/

var foo = { bar: 1,
            baz: 2 };

ImportDeclaration

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 4, { "ImportDeclaration": 1 } option (the default):

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ImportDeclaration": 1 }]*/

import { foo,
    bar,
    baz,
} from 'qux';

import {
    foo,
    bar,
    baz,
} from 'qux';

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 4, { "ImportDeclaration": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ImportDeclaration": "first" }]*/

import { foo,
    bar,
    baz,
} from 'qux';

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 4, { "ImportDeclaration": "first" } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ImportDeclaration": "first" }]*/

import { foo,
         bar,
         baz,
} from 'qux';

flatTernaryExpressions

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": false } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": false }]*/

var a =
    foo ? bar :
    baz ? qux :
    boop;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": false } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": false }]*/

var a =
    foo ? bar :
        baz ? qux :
            boop;

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": true } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": true }]*/

var a =
    foo ? bar :
        baz ? qux :
            boop;

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": true } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "flatTernaryExpressions": true }]*/

var a =
    foo ? bar :
    baz ? qux :
    boop;

offsetTernaryExpressions

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": false } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": false }]*/

condition
  ? () => {
      return true
    }
  : () => {
      false
    }

Examples of correct code for this rule with the default 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": false } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": false }]*/

condition
  ? () => {
    return true
  }
  : condition2
    ? () => {
      return true
    }
    : () => {
      return false
    }

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": true } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": true }]*/

condition
  ? () => {
    return true
  }
  : condition2
    ? () => {
      return true
    }
    : () => {
      return false
    }

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": true } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 2, { "offsetTernaryExpressions": true }]*/

condition
  ? () => {
      return true
    }
  : condition2
    ? () => {
        return true
      }
    : () => {
        return false
      }

ignoredNodes

The following configuration ignores the indentation of ConditionalExpression ("ternary expression") nodes:

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 4, { "ignoredNodes": ["ConditionalExpression"] } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ignoredNodes": ["ConditionalExpression"] }]*/

var a = foo
      ? bar
      : baz;

var a = foo
                ? bar
: baz;

The following configuration ignores indentation in the body of IIFEs.

Examples of correct code for this rule with the 4, { "ignoredNodes": ["CallExpression > FunctionExpression.callee > BlockStatement.body"] } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ignoredNodes": ["CallExpression > FunctionExpression.callee > BlockStatement.body"] }]*/

(function() {

foo();
bar();

})

ignoreComments

Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the 4, { "ignoreComments": true } option:

/*eslint indent: ["error", 4, { "ignoreComments": true }] */

if (foo) {
    doSomething();

// comment intentionally de-indented
    doSomethingElse();
}

Compatibility

Expected '!==' and instead saw '!='.
Open

    if (width && this.state.cachedMediaWidth != width) this.setState({ cachedMediaWidth: width });

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell ESLint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Missing parentheses around multilines JSX
Open

        <FormattedMessage

For more information visit Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Severity
Category
Status
Source
Language