Showing 492 of 492 total issues

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.card {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

body {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Don't use IDs in selectors.
Open

#sp-icon-container {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.tt-suggestion > div {

Wrap an immediate function invocation in parentheses.
Open

var hex_sha1 = function () {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/js/sha1.js by eslint

Require IIFEs to be Wrapped (wrap-iife)

You can immediately invoke function expressions, but not function declarations. A common technique to create an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE) is to wrap a function declaration in parentheses. The opening parentheses causes the contained function to be parsed as an expression, rather than a declaration.

// function expression could be unwrapped
var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}();

// function declaration must be wrapped
function () { /* side effects */ }(); // SyntaxError

Rule Details

This rule requires all immediately-invoked function expressions to be wrapped in parentheses.

Options

This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

String option:

  • "outside" enforces always wrapping the call expression. The default is "outside".
  • "inside" enforces always wrapping the function expression.
  • "any" enforces always wrapping, but allows either style.

Object option:

  • "functionPrototypeMethods": true additionally enforces wrapping function expressions invoked using .call and .apply. The default is false.

outside

Examples of incorrect code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

Examples of correct code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

inside

Examples of incorrect code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

Examples of correct code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

any

Examples of incorrect code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped

Examples of correct code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

functionPrototypeMethods

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = function(){ foo(); }()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }())
var x = function(){ foo(); }.call(bar)
var x = (function(){ foo(); }.call(bar))

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = (function(){ foo(); })()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }).call(bar)

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.counter{
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Expected (<length> | <percentage> | <content-sizing> | auto) but found 'device-width'.</content-sizing></percentage></length>
Open

@viewport           { width: device-width; }
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Don't use IDs in selectors.
Open

#sp-title-container {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            if (DiscoveryService._incr_use_count(id,lst) == -1) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/js/ds-client.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.form-control:focus {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Fallback color (hex or RGB) should precede RGBA color.
Open

    color: rgba(0,0,0,0.65);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.card-links a li {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.card-links a li > i {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

.institution {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Expected (<length> | <percentage> | <content-sizing> | auto) but found 'device-width'.</content-sizing></percentage></length>
Open

@-ms-viewport       { width: device-width; }
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Rule doesn't have all its properties in alphabetical order.
Open

pre.prettyprint {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/style.css by csslint

Heading (h2) has already been defined.
Open

h2.accessHeader {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Using width with border can sometimes make elements larger than you expect.
Open

  border: 1px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);

Fallback color (hex or RGB) should precede RGBA color.
Open

    color: rgba(0,0,0,0.65);
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/css/ra21.css by csslint

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            if (list[i].entity.entity_id == entity_id || list[i].entity.entityID == entity_id) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/pyff/site/static/js/ds-client.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Severity
Category
Status
Source
Language