tomchentw/medium-editor-tc-mention

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Function hidePanel has a Cognitive Complexity of 24 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

  hidePanel(isArrowTowardsLeft) {
    this.mentionPanel.classList.remove(`medium-editor-mention-panel-active`);
    const extraActivePanelClassName = this.extraActivePanelClassName || this.extraActiveClassName;

    if (extraActivePanelClassName) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/index.js - About 3 hrs to fix

Cognitive Complexity

Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

  • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
  • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
  • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

Further reading

File index.js has 267 lines of code (exceeds 250 allowed). Consider refactoring.
Open

import {
  default as MediumEditor,
} from "medium-editor";

function last(text) {
Severity: Minor
Found in src/index.js - About 2 hrs to fix

    Function hidePanel has 47 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
    Open

      hidePanel(isArrowTowardsLeft) {
        this.mentionPanel.classList.remove(`medium-editor-mention-panel-active`);
        const extraActivePanelClassName = this.extraActivePanelClassName || this.extraActiveClassName;
    
        if (extraActivePanelClassName) {
    Severity: Minor
    Found in src/index.js - About 1 hr to fix

      Line 84 exceeds the maximum line length of 100.
      Open

      Severity: Minor
      Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

      enforce a maximum line length (max-len)

      Very long lines of code in any language can be difficult to read. In order to aid in readability and maintainability many coders have developed a convention to limit lines of code to X number of characters (traditionally 80 characters).

      var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }, "difficult": "to read" }; // very long

      Rule Details

      This rule enforces a maximum line length to increase code readability and maintainability. The length of a line is defined as the number of Unicode characters in the line.

      Options

      This rule has a number or object option:

      • "code" (default 80) enforces a maximum line length
      • "tabWidth" (default 4) specifies the character width for tab characters
      • "comments" enforces a maximum line length for comments; defaults to value of code
      • "ignorePattern" ignores lines matching a regular expression; can only match a single line and need to be double escaped when written in YAML or JSON
      • "ignoreComments": true ignores all trailing comments and comments on their own line
      • "ignoreTrailingComments": true ignores only trailing comments
      • "ignoreUrls": true ignores lines that contain a URL
      • "ignoreStrings": true ignores lines that contain a double-quoted or single-quoted string
      • "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true ignores lines that contain a template literal
      • "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true ignores lines that contain a RegExp literal

      code

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "code": 80 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80]*/
      
      var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }, "difficult": "to read" };

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "code": 80 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80]*/
      
      var foo = {
        "bar": "This is a bar.",
        "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" },
        "easier": "to read"
      };

      tabWidth

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "tabWidth": 4 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80, 4]*/
      
      \t  \t  var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" } };

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "tabWidth": 4 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80, 4]*/
      
      \t  \t  var foo = {
      \t  \t  \t  \t  "bar": "This is a bar.",
      \t  \t  \t  \t  "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }
      \t  \t  };

      comments

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the { "comments": 65 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "comments": 65 }]*/
      
      /**
       * This is a comment that violates the maximum line length we have specified
      **/

      ignoreComments

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreComments": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreComments": true }]*/
      
      /**
       * This is a really really really really really really really really really long comment
      **/

      ignoreTrailingComments

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreTrailingComments": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreTrailingComments": true }]*/
      
      var foo = 'bar'; // This is a really really really really really really really long comment

      ignoreUrls

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreUrls": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreUrls": true }]*/
      
      var url = 'https://www.example.com/really/really/really/really/really/really/really/long';

      ignoreStrings

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreStrings": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreStrings": true }]*/
      
      var longString = 'this is a really really really really really long string!';

      ignoreTemplateLiterals

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
      
      var longTemplateLiteral = `this is a really really really really really long template literal!`;

      ignoreRegExpLiterals

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true }]*/
      
      var longRegExpLiteral = /this is a really really really really really long regular expression!/;

      ignorePattern

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignorePattern": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignorePattern": "^\\s*var\\s.+=\\s*require\\s*\\(/" }]*/
      
      var dep = require('really/really/really/really/really/really/really/really/long/module');

      Related Rules

      • [complexity](complexity.md)
      • [max-depth](max-depth.md)
      • [max-nested-callbacks](max-nested-callbacks.md)
      • [max-params](max-params.md)
      • [max-statements](max-statements.md) Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

      Line 85 exceeds the maximum line length of 100.
      Open

      Severity: Minor
      Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

      enforce a maximum line length (max-len)

      Very long lines of code in any language can be difficult to read. In order to aid in readability and maintainability many coders have developed a convention to limit lines of code to X number of characters (traditionally 80 characters).

      var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }, "difficult": "to read" }; // very long

      Rule Details

      This rule enforces a maximum line length to increase code readability and maintainability. The length of a line is defined as the number of Unicode characters in the line.

      Options

      This rule has a number or object option:

      • "code" (default 80) enforces a maximum line length
      • "tabWidth" (default 4) specifies the character width for tab characters
      • "comments" enforces a maximum line length for comments; defaults to value of code
      • "ignorePattern" ignores lines matching a regular expression; can only match a single line and need to be double escaped when written in YAML or JSON
      • "ignoreComments": true ignores all trailing comments and comments on their own line
      • "ignoreTrailingComments": true ignores only trailing comments
      • "ignoreUrls": true ignores lines that contain a URL
      • "ignoreStrings": true ignores lines that contain a double-quoted or single-quoted string
      • "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true ignores lines that contain a template literal
      • "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true ignores lines that contain a RegExp literal

      code

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "code": 80 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80]*/
      
      var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }, "difficult": "to read" };

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "code": 80 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80]*/
      
      var foo = {
        "bar": "This is a bar.",
        "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" },
        "easier": "to read"
      };

      tabWidth

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default { "tabWidth": 4 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80, 4]*/
      
      \t  \t  var foo = { "bar": "This is a bar.", "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" } };

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the default { "tabWidth": 4 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", 80, 4]*/
      
      \t  \t  var foo = {
      \t  \t  \t  \t  "bar": "This is a bar.",
      \t  \t  \t  \t  "baz": { "qux": "This is a qux" }
      \t  \t  };

      comments

      Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the { "comments": 65 } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "comments": 65 }]*/
      
      /**
       * This is a comment that violates the maximum line length we have specified
      **/

      ignoreComments

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreComments": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreComments": true }]*/
      
      /**
       * This is a really really really really really really really really really long comment
      **/

      ignoreTrailingComments

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreTrailingComments": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreTrailingComments": true }]*/
      
      var foo = 'bar'; // This is a really really really really really really really long comment

      ignoreUrls

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreUrls": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreUrls": true }]*/
      
      var url = 'https://www.example.com/really/really/really/really/really/really/really/long';

      ignoreStrings

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreStrings": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreStrings": true }]*/
      
      var longString = 'this is a really really really really really long string!';

      ignoreTemplateLiterals

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
      
      var longTemplateLiteral = `this is a really really really really really long template literal!`;

      ignoreRegExpLiterals

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignoreRegExpLiterals": true }]*/
      
      var longRegExpLiteral = /this is a really really really really really long regular expression!/;

      ignorePattern

      Examples of correct code for this rule with the { "ignorePattern": true } option:

      /*eslint max-len: ["error", { "ignorePattern": "^\\s*var\\s.+=\\s*require\\s*\\(/" }]*/
      
      var dep = require('really/really/really/really/really/really/really/really/long/module');

      Related Rules

      • [complexity](complexity.md)
      • [max-depth](max-depth.md)
      • [max-nested-callbacks](max-nested-callbacks.md)
      • [max-params](max-params.md)
      • [max-statements](max-statements.md) Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

      Function componentDidMount has 32 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
      Open

      Severity: Minor
      Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js - About 1 hr to fix

        Function wrapWordInMentionAt has 30 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
        Open

          wrapWordInMentionAt() {
            const selection = this.document.getSelection();
            if (!selection.rangeCount) {
              return;
            }
        Severity: Minor
        Found in src/index.js - About 1 hr to fix

          Function getWordFromSelection has 27 lines of code (exceeds 25 allowed). Consider refactoring.
          Open

            getWordFromSelection(target, initialDiff) {
              const {
                startContainer,
                startOffset,
                endContainer,
          Severity: Minor
          Found in src/index.js - About 1 hr to fix

            Function getWordFromSelection has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
            Open

              getWordFromSelection(target, initialDiff) {
                const {
                  startContainer,
                  startOffset,
                  endContainer,
            Severity: Minor
            Found in src/index.js - About 25 mins to fix

            Cognitive Complexity

            Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

            A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

            • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
            • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
            • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

            Further reading

            Function wrapWordInMentionAt has a Cognitive Complexity of 6 (exceeds 5 allowed). Consider refactoring.
            Open

              wrapWordInMentionAt() {
                const selection = this.document.getSelection();
                if (!selection.rangeCount) {
                  return;
                }
            Severity: Minor
            Found in src/index.js - About 25 mins to fix

            Cognitive Complexity

            Cognitive Complexity is a measure of how difficult a unit of code is to intuitively understand. Unlike Cyclomatic Complexity, which determines how difficult your code will be to test, Cognitive Complexity tells you how difficult your code will be to read and comprehend.

            A method's cognitive complexity is based on a few simple rules:

            • Code is not considered more complex when it uses shorthand that the language provides for collapsing multiple statements into one
            • Code is considered more complex for each "break in the linear flow of the code"
            • Code is considered more complex when "flow breaking structures are nested"

            Further reading

            'currentMentionText.substring' is missing in props validation
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            For more information visit Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Strings must use backtick.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            enforce the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes (quotes)

            JavaScript allows you to define strings in one of three ways: double quotes, single quotes, and backticks (as of ECMAScript 6). For example:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `backtick`;    // ES6 only

            Each of these lines creates a string and, in some cases, can be used interchangeably. The choice of how to define strings in a codebase is a stylistic one outside of template literals (which allow embedded of expressions to be interpreted).

            Many codebases require strings to be defined in a consistent manner.

            Rule Details

            This rule enforces the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes.

            Options

            This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

            String option:

            • "double" (default) requires the use of double quotes wherever possible
            • "single" requires the use of single quotes wherever possible
            • "backtick" requires the use of backticks wherever possible

            Object option:

            • "avoidEscape": true allows strings to use single-quotes or double-quotes so long as the string contains a quote that would have to be escaped otherwise
            • "allowTemplateLiterals": true allows strings to use backticks

            Deprecated: The object property avoid-escape is deprecated; please use the object property avoidEscape instead.

            double

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var unescaped = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var backtick = `back\ntick`;  // backticks are allowed due to newline
            var backtick = tag`backtick`; // backticks are allowed due to tag

            single

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `back${x}tick`; // backticks are allowed due to substitution

            backticks

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = 'a string containing `backticks`';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var backtick = `backtick`;

            avoidEscape

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing `backtick` quotes"

            allowTemplateLiterals

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var double = `double`;

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var single = `single`;

            When Not To Use It

            If you do not need consistency in your string styles, you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Strings must use backtick.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            enforce the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes (quotes)

            JavaScript allows you to define strings in one of three ways: double quotes, single quotes, and backticks (as of ECMAScript 6). For example:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `backtick`;    // ES6 only

            Each of these lines creates a string and, in some cases, can be used interchangeably. The choice of how to define strings in a codebase is a stylistic one outside of template literals (which allow embedded of expressions to be interpreted).

            Many codebases require strings to be defined in a consistent manner.

            Rule Details

            This rule enforces the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes.

            Options

            This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

            String option:

            • "double" (default) requires the use of double quotes wherever possible
            • "single" requires the use of single quotes wherever possible
            • "backtick" requires the use of backticks wherever possible

            Object option:

            • "avoidEscape": true allows strings to use single-quotes or double-quotes so long as the string contains a quote that would have to be escaped otherwise
            • "allowTemplateLiterals": true allows strings to use backticks

            Deprecated: The object property avoid-escape is deprecated; please use the object property avoidEscape instead.

            double

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var unescaped = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var backtick = `back\ntick`;  // backticks are allowed due to newline
            var backtick = tag`backtick`; // backticks are allowed due to tag

            single

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `back${x}tick`; // backticks are allowed due to substitution

            backticks

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = 'a string containing `backticks`';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var backtick = `backtick`;

            avoidEscape

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing `backtick` quotes"

            allowTemplateLiterals

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var double = `double`;

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var single = `single`;

            When Not To Use It

            If you do not need consistency in your string styles, you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Strings must use backtick.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            enforce the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes (quotes)

            JavaScript allows you to define strings in one of three ways: double quotes, single quotes, and backticks (as of ECMAScript 6). For example:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `backtick`;    // ES6 only

            Each of these lines creates a string and, in some cases, can be used interchangeably. The choice of how to define strings in a codebase is a stylistic one outside of template literals (which allow embedded of expressions to be interpreted).

            Many codebases require strings to be defined in a consistent manner.

            Rule Details

            This rule enforces the consistent use of either backticks, double, or single quotes.

            Options

            This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

            String option:

            • "double" (default) requires the use of double quotes wherever possible
            • "single" requires the use of single quotes wherever possible
            • "backtick" requires the use of backticks wherever possible

            Object option:

            • "avoidEscape": true allows strings to use single-quotes or double-quotes so long as the string contains a quote that would have to be escaped otherwise
            • "allowTemplateLiterals": true allows strings to use backticks

            Deprecated: The object property avoid-escape is deprecated; please use the object property avoidEscape instead.

            double

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var unescaped = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "double" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var backtick = `back\ntick`;  // backticks are allowed due to newline
            var backtick = tag`backtick`; // backticks are allowed due to tag

            single

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "single" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var backtick = `back${x}tick`; // backticks are allowed due to substitution

            backticks

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var double = "double";
            var unescaped = 'a string containing `backticks`';

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "backtick" option:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var backtick = `backtick`;

            avoidEscape

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'a string containing "double" quotes';

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing 'single' quotes";

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "backtick", { "avoidEscape": true }]*/
            
            var double = "a string containing `backtick` quotes"

            allowTemplateLiterals

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "double", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var double = "double";
            var double = `double`;

            Examples of additional correct code for this rule with the "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true } options:

            /*eslint quotes: ["error", "single", { "allowTemplateLiterals": true }]*/
            
            var single = 'single';
            var single = `single`;

            When Not To Use It

            If you do not need consistency in your string styles, you can safely disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Missing trailing comma.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            require or disallow trailing commas (comma-dangle)

            Trailing commas in object literals are valid according to the ECMAScript 5 (and ECMAScript 3!) spec. However, IE8 (when not in IE8 document mode) and below will throw an error when it encounters trailing commas in JavaScript.

            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux",
            };

            Trailing commas simplify adding and removing items to objects and arrays, since only the lines you are modifying must be touched. Another argument in favor of trailing commas is that it improves the clarity of diffs when an item is added or removed from an object or array:

            Less clear:

            var foo = {
            -    bar: "baz",
            -    qux: "quux"
            +    bar: "baz"
             };

            More clear:

            var foo = {
                 bar: "baz",
            -    qux: "quux",
             };

            Rule Details

            This rule enforces consistent use of trailing commas in object and array literals.

            Options

            This rule has a string option or an object option:

            {
                "comma-dangle": ["error", "never"],
                // or
                "comma-dangle": ["error", {
                    "arrays": "never",
                    "objects": "never",
                    "imports": "never",
                    "exports": "never",
                    "functions": "ignore",
                }]
            }
            • "never" (default) disallows trailing commas
            • "always" requires trailing commas
            • "always-multiline" requires trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }
            • "only-multiline" allows (but does not require) trailing commas when the last element or property is in a different line than the closing ] or } and disallows trailing commas when the last element or property is on the same line as the closing ] or }

            Trailing commas in function declarations and function calls are valid syntax since ECMAScript 2017; however, the string option does not check these situations for backwards compatibility.

            You can also use an object option to configure this rule for each type of syntax. Each of the following options can be set to "never", "always", "always-multiline", "only-multiline", or "ignore". The default for each option is "never" unless otherwise specified.

            • arrays is for array literals and array patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let [a,] = [1,];)
            • objects is for object literals and object patterns of destructuring. (e.g. let {a,} = {a: 1};)
            • imports is for import declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. import {a,} from "foo";)
            • exports is for export declarations of ES Modules. (e.g. export {a,};)
            • functions is for function declarations and function calls. (e.g. (function(a,){ })(b,);)
              functions is set to "ignore" by default for consistency with the string option.

            never

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "never" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux",
            };
            
            var arr = [1,2,];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux",
            });

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "never" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "never"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux"
            };
            
            var arr = [1,2];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux"
            });

            always

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux"
            };
            
            var arr = [1,2];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux"
            });

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux",
            };
            
            var arr = [1,2,];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux",
            });

            always-multiline

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux"
            };
            
            var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };
            
            var arr = [1,2,];
            
            var arr = [1,
                2,];
            
            var arr = [
                1,
                2
            ];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux"
            });

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "always-multiline" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "always-multiline"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux",
            };
            
            var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
            var arr = [1,2];
            
            var arr = [1,
                2];
            
            var arr = [
                1,
                2,
            ];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux",
            });

            only-multiline

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/
            
            var foo = { bar: "baz", qux: "quux", };
            
            var arr = [1,2,];
            
            var arr = [1,
                2,];

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "only-multiline" option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", "only-multiline"]*/
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux",
            };
            
            var foo = {
                bar: "baz",
                qux: "quux"
            };
            
            var foo = {bar: "baz", qux: "quux"};
            var arr = [1,2];
            
            var arr = [1,
                2];
            
            var arr = [
                1,
                2,
            ];
            
            var arr = [
                1,
                2
            ];
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux",
            });
            
            foo({
              bar: "baz",
              qux: "quux"
            });

            functions

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/
            
            function foo(a, b,) {
            }
            
            foo(a, b,);
            new foo(a, b,);

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "never"} option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "never"}]*/
            
            function foo(a, b) {
            }
            
            foo(a, b);
            new foo(a, b);

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/
            
            function foo(a, b) {
            }
            
            foo(a, b);
            new foo(a, b);

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the {"functions": "always"} option:

            /*eslint comma-dangle: ["error", {"functions": "always"}]*/
            
            function foo(a, b,) {
            }
            
            foo(a, b,);
            new foo(a, b,);

            When Not To Use It

            You can turn this rule off if you are not concerned with dangling commas. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Unexpected unnamed method 'renderPanelContent'.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            Require or disallow named function expressions (func-names)

            A pattern that's becoming more common is to give function expressions names to aid in debugging. For example:

            Foo.prototype.bar = function bar() {};

            Adding the second bar in the above example is optional. If you leave off the function name then when the function throws an exception you are likely to get something similar to anonymous function in the stack trace. If you provide the optional name for a function expression then you will get the name of the function expression in the stack trace.

            Rule Details

            This rule can enforce or disallow the use of named function expressions.

            Options

            This rule has a string option:

            • "always" (default) requires function expressions to have a name
            • "as-needed" requires function expressions to have a name, if the name cannot be assigned automatically in an ES6 environment
            • "never" disallows named function expressions, except in recursive functions, where a name is needed

            always

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "always" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "always"]*/
            
            Foo.prototype.bar = function() {};
            
            (function() {
                // ...
            }())

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "always" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "always"]*/
            
            Foo.prototype.bar = function bar() {};
            
            (function bar() {
                // ...
            }())

            as-needed

            ECMAScript 6 introduced a name property on all functions. The value of name is determined by evaluating the code around the function to see if a name can be inferred. For example, a function assigned to a variable will automatically have a name property equal to the name of the variable. The value of name is then used in stack traces for easier debugging.

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "as-needed" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
            
            Foo.prototype.bar = function() {};
            
            (function() {
                // ...
            }())

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "as-needed" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
            
            var bar = function() {};
            
            (function bar() {
                // ...
            }())

            never

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "never" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "never"]*/
            
            Foo.prototype.bar = function bar() {};
            
            (function bar() {
                // ...
            }())

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "never" option:

            /*eslint func-names: ["error", "never"]*/
            
            Foo.prototype.bar = function() {};
            
            (function() {
                // ...
            }())

            Further Reading

            Compatibility

            Use default import syntax to import 'React'.
            Open

            import {default as React} from "react";
            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/client.js by eslint

            For more information visit Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            'currentMentionText' is missing in props validation
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            For more information visit Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            'selectMentionCallback' is missing in props validation
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            For more information visit Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

            Expected parentheses around arrow function argument having a body with curly braces.
            Open

            Severity: Minor
            Found in examples/gh-pages/src/ReactRoot.js by eslint

            Require parens in arrow function arguments (arrow-parens)

            Arrow functions can omit parentheses when they have exactly one parameter. In all other cases the parameter(s) must be wrapped in parentheses. This rule enforces the consistent use of parentheses in arrow functions.

            Rule Details

            This rule enforces parentheses around arrow function parameters regardless of arity. For example:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            // Bad
            a => {}
            
            // Good
            (a) => {}

            Following this style will help you find arrow functions (=>) which may be mistakenly included in a condition when a comparison such as >= was the intent.

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            // Bad
            if (a => 2) {
            }
            
            // Good
            if (a >= 2) {
            }

            The rule can also be configured to discourage the use of parens when they are not required:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            // Bad
            (a) => {}
            
            // Good
            a => {}

            Options

            This rule has a string option and an object one.

            String options are:

            • "always" (default) requires parens around arguments in all cases.
            • "as-needed" allows omitting parens when there is only one argument.

            Object properties for variants of the "as-needed" option:

            • "requireForBlockBody": true modifies the as-needed rule in order to require parens if the function body is in an instructions block (surrounded by braces).

            always

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the default "always" option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            a => {};
            a => a;
            a => {'\n'};
            a.then(foo => {});
            a.then(foo => a);
            a(foo => { if (true) {} });

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the default "always" option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "always"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            () => {};
            (a) => {};
            (a) => a;
            (a) => {'\n'}
            a.then((foo) => {});
            a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });

            If Statements

            One of benefits of this option is that it prevents the incorrect use of arrow functions in conditionals:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var a = 1;
            var b = 2;
            // ...
            if (a => b) {
             console.log('bigger');
            } else {
             console.log('smaller');
            }
            // outputs 'bigger', not smaller as expected

            The contents of the if statement is an arrow function, not a comparison.

            If the arrow function is intentional, it should be wrapped in parens to remove ambiguity.

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var a = 1;
            var b = 0;
            // ...
            if ((a) => b) {
             console.log('truthy value returned');
            } else {
             console.log('falsey value returned');
            }
            // outputs 'truthy value returned'

            The following is another example of this behavior:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
            var f = a => b ? c: d;
            // f = ?

            f is an arrow function which takes a as an argument and returns the result of b ? c: d.

            This should be rewritten like so:

            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            var a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4;
            var f = (a) => b ? c: d;

            as-needed

            Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            (a) => {};
            (a) => a;
            (a) => {'\n'};
            a.then((foo) => {});
            a.then((foo) => a);
            a((foo) => { if (true) {} });

            Examples of correct code for this rule with the "as-needed" option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: ["error", "as-needed"]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            () => {};
            a => {};
            a => a;
            a => {'\n'};
            a.then(foo => {});
            a.then(foo => { if (true) {} });
            (a, b, c) => a;
            (a = 10) => a;
            ([a, b]) => a;
            ({a, b}) => a;

            requireForBlockBody

            Examples of incorrect code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            (a) => a;
            a => {};
            a => {'\n'};
            a.map((x) => x * x);
            a.map(x => {
              return x * x;
            });
            a.then(foo => {});

            Examples of correct code for the { "requireForBlockBody": true } option:

            /*eslint arrow-parens: [2, "as-needed", { "requireForBlockBody": true }]*/
            /*eslint-env es6*/
            
            (a) => {};
            (a) => {'\n'};
            a => ({});
            () => {};
            a => a;
            a.then((foo) => {});
            a.then((foo) => { if (true) {} });
            a((foo) => { if (true) {} });
            (a, b, c) => a;
            (a = 10) => a;
            ([a, b]) => a;
            ({a, b}) => a;

            Further Reading

            Severity
            Category
            Status
            Source
            Language