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Move the invocation into the parens that contain the function.
Open

(function ($) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.captcha.js by eslint

Require IIFEs to be Wrapped (wrap-iife)

You can immediately invoke function expressions, but not function declarations. A common technique to create an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE) is to wrap a function declaration in parentheses. The opening parentheses causes the contained function to be parsed as an expression, rather than a declaration.

// function expression could be unwrapped
var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}();

// function declaration must be wrapped
function () { /* side effects */ }(); // SyntaxError

Rule Details

This rule requires all immediately-invoked function expressions to be wrapped in parentheses.

Options

This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

String option:

  • "outside" enforces always wrapping the call expression. The default is "outside".
  • "inside" enforces always wrapping the function expression.
  • "any" enforces always wrapping, but allows either style.

Object option:

  • "functionPrototypeMethods": true additionally enforces wrapping function expressions invoked using .call and .apply. The default is false.

outside

Examples of incorrect code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

Examples of correct code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

inside

Examples of incorrect code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

Examples of correct code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

any

Examples of incorrect code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped

Examples of correct code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

functionPrototypeMethods

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = function(){ foo(); }()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }())
var x = function(){ foo(); }.call(bar)
var x = (function(){ foo(); }.call(bar))

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = (function(){ foo(); })()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }).call(bar)

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Move the invocation into the parens that contain the function.
Open

yii.validation = (function ($) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require IIFEs to be Wrapped (wrap-iife)

You can immediately invoke function expressions, but not function declarations. A common technique to create an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE) is to wrap a function declaration in parentheses. The opening parentheses causes the contained function to be parsed as an expression, rather than a declaration.

// function expression could be unwrapped
var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}();

// function declaration must be wrapped
function () { /* side effects */ }(); // SyntaxError

Rule Details

This rule requires all immediately-invoked function expressions to be wrapped in parentheses.

Options

This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

String option:

  • "outside" enforces always wrapping the call expression. The default is "outside".
  • "inside" enforces always wrapping the function expression.
  • "any" enforces always wrapping, but allows either style.

Object option:

  • "functionPrototypeMethods": true additionally enforces wrapping function expressions invoked using .call and .apply. The default is false.

outside

Examples of incorrect code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

Examples of correct code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

inside

Examples of incorrect code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

Examples of correct code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

any

Examples of incorrect code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped

Examples of correct code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

functionPrototypeMethods

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = function(){ foo(); }()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }())
var x = function(){ foo(); }.call(bar)
var x = (function(){ foo(); }.call(bar))

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = (function(){ foo(); })()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }).call(bar)

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            hash = hash == null ? options.hash : hash[options.caseSensitive ? 0 : 1];
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

                    valid = value == compareValue;
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '!==' and instead saw '!='.
Open

                    valid = value != compareValue;
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            if (ipVersion == 6) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected an assignment or function call and instead saw an expression.
Open

                !ok || ok();
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.js by eslint

Disallow Unused Expressions (no-unused-expressions)

An unused expression which has no effect on the state of the program indicates a logic error.

For example, n + 1; is not a syntax error, but it might be a typing mistake where a programmer meant an assignment statement n += 1; instead.

Rule Details

This rule aims to eliminate unused expressions which have no effect on the state of the program.

This rule does not apply to function calls or constructor calls with the new operator, because they could have side effects on the state of the program.

var i = 0;
function increment() { i += 1; }
increment(); // return value is unused, but i changed as a side effect

var nThings = 0;
function Thing() { nThings += 1; }
new Thing(); // constructed object is unused, but nThings changed as a side effect

This rule does not apply to directives (which are in the form of literal string expressions such as "use strict"; at the beginning of a script, module, or function).

Sequence expressions (those using a comma, such as a = 1, b = 2) are always considered unused unless their return value is assigned or used in a condition evaluation, or a function call is made with the sequence expression value.

Options

This rule, in its default state, does not require any arguments. If you would like to enable one or more of the following you may pass an object with the options set as follows:

  • allowShortCircuit set to true will allow you to use short circuit evaluations in your expressions (Default: false).
  • allowTernary set to true will enable you to use ternary operators in your expressions similarly to short circuit evaluations (Default: false).
  • allowTaggedTemplates set to true will enable you to use tagged template literals in your expressions (Default: false).

These options allow unused expressions only if all of the code paths either directly change the state (for example, assignment statement) or could have side effects (for example, function call).

Examples of incorrect code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

0

if(0) 0

{0}

f(0), {}

a && b()

a, b()

c = a, b;

a() && function namedFunctionInExpressionContext () {f();}

(function anIncompleteIIFE () {});

injectGlobal`body{ color: red; }`

Note that one or more string expression statements (with or without semi-colons) will only be considered as unused if they are not in the beginning of a script, module, or function (alone and uninterrupted by other statements). Otherwise, they will be treated as part of a "directive prologue", a section potentially usable by JavaScript engines. This includes "strict mode" directives.

"use strict";
"use asm"
"use stricter";
"use babel"
"any other strings like this in the prologue";

Examples of correct code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

{} // In this context, this is a block statement, not an object literal

{myLabel: someVar} // In this context, this is a block statement with a label and expression, not an object literal

function namedFunctionDeclaration () {}

(function aGenuineIIFE () {}());

f()

a = 0

new C

delete a.b

void a

allowShortCircuit

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a || b

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a && b()
a() || (b = c)

allowTernary

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b : 0
a ? b : c()

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() : c()
a ? (b = c) : d()

allowShortCircuit and allowTernary

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() || (c = d) : e()

allowTaggedTemplates

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

`some untagged template string`;

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

tag`some tagged template string`;

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

                var all = $grid.find(inputs).length == $grid.find(inputs + ":checked").length;
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.gridView.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            var valid = !options.strict && (value == options.trueValue || value == options.falseValue)
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '!==' and instead saw '!='.
Open

            if (h != hash) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected an assignment or function call and instead saw an expression.
Open

                !cancel || cancel();
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.js by eslint

Disallow Unused Expressions (no-unused-expressions)

An unused expression which has no effect on the state of the program indicates a logic error.

For example, n + 1; is not a syntax error, but it might be a typing mistake where a programmer meant an assignment statement n += 1; instead.

Rule Details

This rule aims to eliminate unused expressions which have no effect on the state of the program.

This rule does not apply to function calls or constructor calls with the new operator, because they could have side effects on the state of the program.

var i = 0;
function increment() { i += 1; }
increment(); // return value is unused, but i changed as a side effect

var nThings = 0;
function Thing() { nThings += 1; }
new Thing(); // constructed object is unused, but nThings changed as a side effect

This rule does not apply to directives (which are in the form of literal string expressions such as "use strict"; at the beginning of a script, module, or function).

Sequence expressions (those using a comma, such as a = 1, b = 2) are always considered unused unless their return value is assigned or used in a condition evaluation, or a function call is made with the sequence expression value.

Options

This rule, in its default state, does not require any arguments. If you would like to enable one or more of the following you may pass an object with the options set as follows:

  • allowShortCircuit set to true will allow you to use short circuit evaluations in your expressions (Default: false).
  • allowTernary set to true will enable you to use ternary operators in your expressions similarly to short circuit evaluations (Default: false).
  • allowTaggedTemplates set to true will enable you to use tagged template literals in your expressions (Default: false).

These options allow unused expressions only if all of the code paths either directly change the state (for example, assignment statement) or could have side effects (for example, function call).

Examples of incorrect code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

0

if(0) 0

{0}

f(0), {}

a && b()

a, b()

c = a, b;

a() && function namedFunctionInExpressionContext () {f();}

(function anIncompleteIIFE () {});

injectGlobal`body{ color: red; }`

Note that one or more string expression statements (with or without semi-colons) will only be considered as unused if they are not in the beginning of a script, module, or function (alone and uninterrupted by other statements). Otherwise, they will be treated as part of a "directive prologue", a section potentially usable by JavaScript engines. This includes "strict mode" directives.

"use strict";
"use asm"
"use stricter";
"use babel"
"any other strings like this in the prologue";

Examples of correct code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

{} // In this context, this is a block statement, not an object literal

{myLabel: someVar} // In this context, this is a block statement with a label and expression, not an object literal

function namedFunctionDeclaration () {}

(function aGenuineIIFE () {}());

f()

a = 0

new C

delete a.b

void a

allowShortCircuit

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a || b

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a && b()
a() || (b = c)

allowTernary

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b : 0
a ? b : c()

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() : c()
a ? (b = c) : d()

allowShortCircuit and allowTernary

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() || (c = d) : e()

allowTaggedTemplates

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

`some untagged template string`;

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

tag`some tagged template string`;

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            if (options.dataType == 'jsonp') {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected an assignment or function call and instead saw an expression.
Open

                $.inArray(url, styleSheets) === -1 ? styleSheets.push(url) : $(this).remove();
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.js by eslint

Disallow Unused Expressions (no-unused-expressions)

An unused expression which has no effect on the state of the program indicates a logic error.

For example, n + 1; is not a syntax error, but it might be a typing mistake where a programmer meant an assignment statement n += 1; instead.

Rule Details

This rule aims to eliminate unused expressions which have no effect on the state of the program.

This rule does not apply to function calls or constructor calls with the new operator, because they could have side effects on the state of the program.

var i = 0;
function increment() { i += 1; }
increment(); // return value is unused, but i changed as a side effect

var nThings = 0;
function Thing() { nThings += 1; }
new Thing(); // constructed object is unused, but nThings changed as a side effect

This rule does not apply to directives (which are in the form of literal string expressions such as "use strict"; at the beginning of a script, module, or function).

Sequence expressions (those using a comma, such as a = 1, b = 2) are always considered unused unless their return value is assigned or used in a condition evaluation, or a function call is made with the sequence expression value.

Options

This rule, in its default state, does not require any arguments. If you would like to enable one or more of the following you may pass an object with the options set as follows:

  • allowShortCircuit set to true will allow you to use short circuit evaluations in your expressions (Default: false).
  • allowTernary set to true will enable you to use ternary operators in your expressions similarly to short circuit evaluations (Default: false).
  • allowTaggedTemplates set to true will enable you to use tagged template literals in your expressions (Default: false).

These options allow unused expressions only if all of the code paths either directly change the state (for example, assignment statement) or could have side effects (for example, function call).

Examples of incorrect code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

0

if(0) 0

{0}

f(0), {}

a && b()

a, b()

c = a, b;

a() && function namedFunctionInExpressionContext () {f();}

(function anIncompleteIIFE () {});

injectGlobal`body{ color: red; }`

Note that one or more string expression statements (with or without semi-colons) will only be considered as unused if they are not in the beginning of a script, module, or function (alone and uninterrupted by other statements). Otherwise, they will be treated as part of a "directive prologue", a section potentially usable by JavaScript engines. This includes "strict mode" directives.

"use strict";
"use asm"
"use stricter";
"use babel"
"any other strings like this in the prologue";

Examples of correct code for the default { "allowShortCircuit": false, "allowTernary": false } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: "error"*/

{} // In this context, this is a block statement, not an object literal

{myLabel: someVar} // In this context, this is a block statement with a label and expression, not an object literal

function namedFunctionDeclaration () {}

(function aGenuineIIFE () {}());

f()

a = 0

new C

delete a.b

void a

allowShortCircuit

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a || b

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true }]*/

a && b()
a() || (b = c)

allowTernary

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b : 0
a ? b : c()

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTernary": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() : c()
a ? (b = c) : d()

allowShortCircuit and allowTernary

Examples of correct code for the { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true } options:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowShortCircuit": true, "allowTernary": true }]*/

a ? b() || (c = d) : e()

allowTaggedTemplates

Examples of incorrect code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

`some untagged template string`;

Examples of correct code for the { "allowTaggedTemplates": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-expressions: ["error", { "allowTaggedTemplates": true }]*/

tag`some tagged template string`;

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

                if ($.inArray(v, options.range) == -1) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected confirm.
Open

            if (window.confirm(message)) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.js by eslint

Disallow Use of Alert (no-alert)

JavaScript's alert, confirm, and prompt functions are widely considered to be obtrusive as UI elements and should be replaced by a more appropriate custom UI implementation. Furthermore, alert is often used while debugging code, which should be removed before deployment to production.

alert("here!");

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at catching debugging code that should be removed and popup UI elements that should be replaced with less obtrusive, custom UIs. As such, it will warn when it encounters alert, prompt, and confirm function calls which are not shadowed.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-alert: "error"*/

alert("here!");

confirm("Are you sure?");

prompt("What's your name?", "John Doe");

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-alert: "error"*/

customAlert("Something happened!");

customConfirm("Are you sure?");

customPrompt("Who are you?");

function foo() {
    var alert = myCustomLib.customAlert;
    alert();
}

Related Rules

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            } else if (!options.strict && value == options.requiredValue || options.strict && value === options.requiredValue) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

            var valid = !options.strict && (value == options.trueValue || value == options.falseValue)
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Use ‘===’ to compare with ‘null’.
Open

            hash = hash == null ? options.hash : hash[options.caseSensitive ? 0 : 1];
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.validation.js by eslint

Disallow Null Comparisons (no-eq-null)

Comparing to null without a type-checking operator (== or !=), can have unintended results as the comparison will evaluate to true when comparing to not just a null, but also an undefined value.

if (foo == null) {
  bar();
}

Rule Details

The no-eq-null rule aims reduce potential bug and unwanted behavior by ensuring that comparisons to null only match null, and not also undefined. As such it will flag comparisons to null when using == and !=.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-eq-null: "error"*/

if (foo == null) {
  bar();
}

while (qux != null) {
  baz();
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-eq-null: "error"*/

if (foo === null) {
  bar();
}

while (qux !== null) {
  baz();
}

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Expected '===' and instead saw '=='.
Open

        if ($button.length && $button.attr('type') == 'submit' && $button.attr('name')) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.activeForm.js by eslint

Require === and !== (eqeqeq)

It is considered good practice to use the type-safe equality operators === and !== instead of their regular counterparts == and !=.

The reason for this is that == and != do type coercion which follows the rather obscure Abstract Equality Comparison Algorithm. For instance, the following statements are all considered true:

  • [] == false
  • [] == ![]
  • 3 == "03"

If one of those occurs in an innocent-looking statement such as a == b the actual problem is very difficult to spot.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating the type-unsafe equality operators.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint eqeqeq: "error"*/

if (x == 42) { }

if ("" == text) { }

if (obj.getStuff() != undefined) { }

The --fix option on the command line automatically fixes some problems reported by this rule. A problem is only fixed if one of the operands is a typeof expression, or if both operands are literals with the same type.

Options

always

The "always" option (default) enforces the use of === and !== in every situation (except when you opt-in to more specific handling of null [see below]).

Examples of incorrect code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a == b
foo == true
bananas != 1
value == undefined
typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

Examples of correct code for the "always" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "always"]*/

a === b
foo === true
bananas !== 1
value === undefined
typeof foo === 'undefined'
'hello' !== 'world'
0 === 0
true === true
foo === null

This rule optionally takes a second argument, which should be an object with the following supported properties:

  • "null": Customize how this rule treats null literals. Possible values:
    • always (default) - Always use === or !==.
    • never - Never use === or !== with null.
    • ignore - Do not apply this rule to null.

smart

The "smart" option enforces the use of === and !== except for these cases:

  • Comparing two literal values
  • Evaluating the value of typeof
  • Comparing against null

Examples of incorrect code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

// comparing two variables requires ===
a == b

// only one side is a literal
foo == true
bananas != 1

// comparing to undefined requires ===
value == undefined

Examples of correct code for the "smart" option:

/*eslint eqeqeq: ["error", "smart"]*/

typeof foo == 'undefined'
'hello' != 'world'
0 == 0
true == true
foo == null

allow-null

Deprecated: Instead of using this option use "always" and pass a "null" option property with value "ignore". This will tell eslint to always enforce strict equality except when comparing with the null literal.

["error", "always", {"null": "ignore"}]

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to enforce a style for using equality operators, then it's safe to disable this rule. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Move the invocation into the parens that contain the function.
Open

(function ($) {
Severity: Minor
Found in framework/assets/yii.gridView.js by eslint

Require IIFEs to be Wrapped (wrap-iife)

You can immediately invoke function expressions, but not function declarations. A common technique to create an immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE) is to wrap a function declaration in parentheses. The opening parentheses causes the contained function to be parsed as an expression, rather than a declaration.

// function expression could be unwrapped
var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}();

// function declaration must be wrapped
function () { /* side effects */ }(); // SyntaxError

Rule Details

This rule requires all immediately-invoked function expressions to be wrapped in parentheses.

Options

This rule has two options, a string option and an object option.

String option:

  • "outside" enforces always wrapping the call expression. The default is "outside".
  • "inside" enforces always wrapping the function expression.
  • "any" enforces always wrapping, but allows either style.

Object option:

  • "functionPrototypeMethods": true additionally enforces wrapping function expressions invoked using .call and .apply. The default is false.

outside

Examples of incorrect code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

Examples of correct code for the default "outside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "outside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

inside

Examples of incorrect code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression

Examples of correct code for the "inside" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "inside"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

any

Examples of incorrect code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = function () { return { y: 1 };}(); // unwrapped

Examples of correct code for the "any" option:

/*eslint wrap-iife: ["error", "any"]*/

var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };}()); // wrapped call expression
var x = (function () { return { y: 1 };})(); // wrapped function expression

functionPrototypeMethods

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = function(){ foo(); }()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }())
var x = function(){ foo(); }.call(bar)
var x = (function(){ foo(); }.call(bar))

Examples of correct code for this rule with the "inside", { "functionPrototypeMethods": true } options:

/* eslint wrap-iife: [2, "inside", { functionPrototypeMethods: true }] */

var x = (function(){ foo(); })()
var x = (function(){ foo(); }).call(bar)

Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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