jadjoubran/laravel5-angular-material-starter

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Showing 53 of 53 total issues

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://fonts.gstatic.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

const elixir = require('laravel-elixir');
Severity: Minor
Found in gulpfile.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

var Elixir = require('laravel-elixir');
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/swPrecache.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'global' is not defined.
Open

(function(f){if(typeof exports==="object"&&typeof module!=="undefined"){module.exports=f()}else if(typeof define==="function"&&define.amd){define([],f)}else{var g;if(typeof window!=="undefined"){g=window}else if(typeof global!=="undefined"){g=global}else if(typeof self!=="undefined"){g=self}else{g=this}g.toolbox = f()}})(function(){var define,module,exports;return (function e(t,n,r){function s(o,u){if(!n[o]){if(!t[o]){var a=typeof require=="function"&&require;if(!u&&a)return a(o,!0);if(i)return i(o,!0);var f=new Error("Cannot find module '"+o+"'");throw f.code="MODULE_NOT_FOUND",f}var l=n[o]={exports:{}};t[o][0].call(l.exports,function(e){var n=t[o][1][e];return s(n?n:e)},l,l.exports,e,t,n,r)}return n[o].exports}var i=typeof require=="function"&&require;for(var o=0;o<r.length;o++)s(r[o]);return s})({1:[function(require,module,exports){
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://fonts.googleapis.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://fonts.gstatic.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

var path = require('path');
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/swPrecache.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

var swPrecache = require('sw-precache');
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/swPrecache.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

(function(f){if(typeof exports==="object"&&typeof module!=="undefined"){module.exports=f()}else if(typeof define==="function"&&define.amd){define([],f)}else{var g;if(typeof window!=="undefined"){g=window}else if(typeof global!=="undefined"){g=global}else if(typeof self!=="undefined"){g=self}else{g=this}g.toolbox = f()}})(function(){var define,module,exports;return (function e(t,n,r){function s(o,u){if(!n[o]){if(!t[o]){var a=typeof require=="function"&&require;if(!u&&a)return a(o,!0);if(i)return i(o,!0);var f=new Error("Cannot find module '"+o+"'");throw f.code="MODULE_NOT_FOUND",f}var l=n[o]={exports:{}};t[o][0].call(l.exports,function(e){var n=t[o][1][e];return s(n?n:e)},l,l.exports,e,t,n,r)}return n[o].exports}var i=typeof require=="function"&&require;for(var o=0;o<r.length;o++)s(r[o]);return s})({1:[function(require,module,exports){
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

require('./tasks/bower.task.js');
Severity: Minor
Found in gulpfile.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://fonts.googleapis.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://ghbtns.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

Unexpected console statement.
Open

          console.warn('Couldn\'t serve response for "%s" from cache: %O', event.request.url, e);
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

disallow the use of console (no-console)

In JavaScript that is designed to be executed in the browser, it's considered a best practice to avoid using methods on console. Such messages are considered to be for debugging purposes and therefore not suitable to ship to the client. In general, calls using console should be stripped before being pushed to production.

console.log("Made it here.");
console.error("That shouldn't have happened.");

Rule Details

This rule disallows calls to methods of the console object.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-console: "error"*/

console.log("Log a debug level message.");
console.warn("Log a warn level message.");
console.error("Log an error level message.");

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-console: "error"*/

// custom console
Console.log("Hello world!");

Options

This rule has an object option for exceptions:

  • "allow" has an array of strings which are allowed methods of the console object

Examples of additional correct code for this rule with a sample { "allow": ["warn", "error"] } option:

/*eslint no-console: ["error", { allow: ["warn", "error"] }] */

console.warn("Log a warn level message.");
console.error("Log an error level message.");

When Not To Use It

If you're using Node.js, however, console is used to output information to the user and so is not strictly used for debugging purposes. If you are developing for Node.js then you most likely do not want this rule enabled.

Related Rules

'require' is not defined.
Open

(function(f){if(typeof exports==="object"&&typeof module!=="undefined"){module.exports=f()}else if(typeof define==="function"&&define.amd){define([],f)}else{var g;if(typeof window!=="undefined"){g=window}else if(typeof global!=="undefined"){g=global}else if(typeof self!=="undefined"){g=self}else{g=this}g.toolbox = f()}})(function(){var define,module,exports;return (function e(t,n,r){function s(o,u){if(!n[o]){if(!t[o]){var a=typeof require=="function"&&require;if(!u&&a)return a(o,!0);if(i)return i(o,!0);var f=new Error("Cannot find module '"+o+"'");throw f.code="MODULE_NOT_FOUND",f}var l=n[o]={exports:{}};t[o][0].call(l.exports,function(e){var n=t[o][1][e];return s(n?n:e)},l,l.exports,e,t,n,r)}return n[o].exports}var i=typeof require=="function"&&require;for(var o=0;o<r.length;o++)s(r[o]);return s})({1:[function(require,module,exports){
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'__dirname' is not defined.
Open

                icon: __dirname + '/../node_modules/laravel-elixir/icons/laravel.png',
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/bower.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

        delete require.cache[require.resolve('./../precache-config.json')]
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/swPrecache.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'$auth' is defined but never used.
Open

export function RoutesRun($state, $transitions, $auth) {
Severity: Minor
Found in angular/run/routes.run.js by eslint

Disallow Unused Variables (no-unused-vars)

Variables that are declared and not used anywhere in the code are most likely an error due to incomplete refactoring. Such variables take up space in the code and can lead to confusion by readers.

Rule Details

This rule is aimed at eliminating unused variables, functions, and parameters of functions.

A variable is considered to be used if any of the following are true:

  • It represents a function that is called (doSomething())
  • It is read (var y = x)
  • It is passed into a function as an argument (doSomething(x))
  • It is read inside of a function that is passed to another function (doSomething(function() { foo(); }))

A variable is not considered to be used if it is only ever assigned to (var x = 5) or declared.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: "error"*/
/*global some_unused_var*/

// It checks variables you have defined as global
some_unused_var = 42;

var x;

// Write-only variables are not considered as used.
var y = 10;
y = 5;

// A read for a modification of itself is not considered as used.
var z = 0;
z = z + 1;

// By default, unused arguments cause warnings.
(function(foo) {
    return 5;
})();

// Unused recursive functions also cause warnings.
function fact(n) {
    if (n < 2) return 1;
    return n * fact(n - 1);
}

// When a function definition destructures an array, unused entries from the array also cause warnings.
function getY([x, y]) {
    return y;
}

Examples of correct code for this rule:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: "error"*/

var x = 10;
alert(x);

// foo is considered used here
myFunc(function foo() {
    // ...
}.bind(this));

(function(foo) {
    return foo;
})();

var myFunc;
myFunc = setTimeout(function() {
    // myFunc is considered used
    myFunc();
}, 50);

// Only the second argument from the descructured array is used.
function getY([, y]) {
    return y;
}

exported

In environments outside of CommonJS or ECMAScript modules, you may use var to create a global variable that may be used by other scripts. You can use the /* exported variableName */ comment block to indicate that this variable is being exported and therefore should not be considered unused.

Note that /* exported */ has no effect for any of the following:

  • when the environment is node or commonjs
  • when parserOptions.sourceType is module
  • when ecmaFeatures.globalReturn is true

The line comment // exported variableName will not work as exported is not line-specific.

Examples of correct code for /* exported variableName */ operation:

/* exported global_var */

var global_var = 42;

Options

This rule takes one argument which can be a string or an object. The string settings are the same as those of the vars property (explained below).

By default this rule is enabled with all option for variables and after-used for arguments.

{
    "rules": {
        "no-unused-vars": ["error", { "vars": "all", "args": "after-used", "ignoreRestSiblings": false }]
    }
}

vars

The vars option has two settings:

  • all checks all variables for usage, including those in the global scope. This is the default setting.
  • local checks only that locally-declared variables are used but will allow global variables to be unused.

vars: local

Examples of correct code for the { "vars": "local" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "vars": "local" }]*/
/*global some_unused_var */

some_unused_var = 42;

varsIgnorePattern

The varsIgnorePattern option specifies exceptions not to check for usage: variables whose names match a regexp pattern. For example, variables whose names contain ignored or Ignored.

Examples of correct code for the { "varsIgnorePattern": "[iI]gnored" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "varsIgnorePattern": "[iI]gnored" }]*/

var firstVarIgnored = 1;
var secondVar = 2;
console.log(secondVar);

args

The args option has three settings:

  • after-used - only the last argument must be used. This allows you, for instance, to have two named parameters to a function and as long as you use the second argument, ESLint will not warn you about the first. This is the default setting.
  • all - all named arguments must be used.
  • none - do not check arguments.

args: after-used

Examples of incorrect code for the default { "args": "after-used" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "args": "after-used" }]*/

// 1 error
// "baz" is defined but never used
(function(foo, bar, baz) {
    return bar;
})();

Examples of correct code for the default { "args": "after-used" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", {"args": "after-used"}]*/

(function(foo, bar, baz) {
    return baz;
})();

args: all

Examples of incorrect code for the { "args": "all" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "args": "all" }]*/

// 2 errors
// "foo" is defined but never used
// "baz" is defined but never used
(function(foo, bar, baz) {
    return bar;
})();

args: none

Examples of correct code for the { "args": "none" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "args": "none" }]*/

(function(foo, bar, baz) {
    return bar;
})();

ignoreRestSiblings

The ignoreRestSiblings option is a boolean (default: false). Using a Rest Property it is possible to "omit" properties from an object, but by default the sibling properties are marked as "unused". With this option enabled the rest property's siblings are ignored.

Examples of correct code for the { "ignoreRestSiblings": true } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "ignoreRestSiblings": true }]*/
// 'type' is ignored because it has a rest property sibling.
var { type, ...coords } = data;

argsIgnorePattern

The argsIgnorePattern option specifies exceptions not to check for usage: arguments whose names match a regexp pattern. For example, variables whose names begin with an underscore.

Examples of correct code for the { "argsIgnorePattern": "^_" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "argsIgnorePattern": "^_" }]*/

function foo(x, _y) {
    return x + 1;
}
foo();

caughtErrors

The caughtErrors option is used for catch block arguments validation.

It has two settings:

  • none - do not check error objects. This is the default setting.
  • all - all named arguments must be used.

caughtErrors: none

Not specifying this rule is equivalent of assigning it to none.

Examples of correct code for the { "caughtErrors": "none" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "caughtErrors": "none" }]*/

try {
    //...
} catch (err) {
    console.error("errors");
}

caughtErrors: all

Examples of incorrect code for the { "caughtErrors": "all" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "caughtErrors": "all" }]*/

// 1 error
// "err" is defined but never used
try {
    //...
} catch (err) {
    console.error("errors");
}

caughtErrorsIgnorePattern

The caughtErrorsIgnorePattern option specifies exceptions not to check for usage: catch arguments whose names match a regexp pattern. For example, variables whose names begin with a string 'ignore'.

Examples of correct code for the { "caughtErrorsIgnorePattern": "^ignore" } option:

/*eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "caughtErrorsIgnorePattern": "^ignore" }]*/

try {
    //...
} catch (ignoreErr) {
    console.error("errors");
}

When Not To Use It

If you don't want to be notified about unused variables or function arguments, you can safely turn this rule off. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'toolbox' is not defined.
Open

toolbox.router.get("'https://ghbtns.com/'", toolbox.cacheFirst, {});
Severity: Minor
Found in public/service-worker.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

'require' is not defined.
Open

var cssnano = require('gulp-cssnano');
Severity: Minor
Found in tasks/bower.task.js by eslint

Disallow Undeclared Variables (no-undef)

This rule can help you locate potential ReferenceErrors resulting from misspellings of variable and parameter names, or accidental implicit globals (for example, from forgetting the var keyword in a for loop initializer).

Rule Details

Any reference to an undeclared variable causes a warning, unless the variable is explicitly mentioned in a /*global ...*/ comment.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

Examples of correct code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global someFunction b:true*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

var a = someFunction();
b = 10;

The b:true syntax in /*global */ indicates that assignment to b is correct.

Examples of incorrect code for this rule with global declaration:

/*global b*/
/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

b = 10;

By default, variables declared in /*global */ are read-only, therefore assignment is incorrect.

Options

  • typeof set to true will warn for variables used inside typeof check (Default false).

typeof

Examples of correct code for the default { "typeof": false } option:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/

if (typeof UndefinedIdentifier === "undefined") {
    // do something ...
}

You can use this option if you want to prevent typeof check on a variable which has not been declared.

Examples of incorrect code for the { "typeof": true } option:

/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Examples of correct code for the { "typeof": true } option with global declaration:

/*global a*/
/*eslint no-undef: ["error", { "typeof": true }] */

if(typeof a === "string"){}

Environments

For convenience, ESLint provides shortcuts that pre-define global variables exposed by popular libraries and runtime environments. This rule supports these environments, as listed in Specifying Environments. A few examples are given below.

browser

Examples of correct code for this rule with browser environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env browser*/

setTimeout(function() {
    alert("Hello");
});

node

Examples of correct code for this rule with node environment:

/*eslint no-undef: "error"*/
/*eslint-env node*/

var fs = require("fs");
module.exports = function() {
    console.log(fs);
};

When Not To Use It

If explicit declaration of global variables is not to your taste.

Compatibility

This rule provides compatibility with treatment of global variables in JSHint and JSLint. Source: http://eslint.org/docs/rules/

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